December 25, 2018

ER 3.2, Let the Games Begin: Welcome, Overlord Anspaugh

Posted in TV tagged , , , , at 1:07 pm by Jenn

These dorks are kind of cute

Summary: Jeanie has finally gotten an appointment with an HIV/AIDS doctor to go over her treatment. Jeanie plans to pay for the medication in cash instead of letting her insurance handle it, since that would alert County to her diagnosis. The doctor goes over the instructions, which will give Jeanie a lot to keep track of. However, if she uses the proper medical precautions, she has only a tiny chance of transmitting HIV to a patient. Jeanie is clearly overwhelmed, and her doctor tells her to try to keep the disease from taking over her life.

Carter has moved to a new apartment building, and his neighbor, Betty, would like some medical advice. She’s having breathing problems, but she doesn’t seem to think that smoking a cigarette will do her any harm. Carter tells her to try an inhaler, then runs off to try to get to work without getting on Benton’s bad side. Carol, Haleh, and Lydia try to get control of a patient who’s high on PCP; she’s not their only wild patient today, and they wonder if the hot weather is making things worse. They then start worrying that the hospital will close, as is the current rumor.

Benton’s trying to track down Carter when he meets a surgeon named Wayne Lentloff who’d like to recruit him for cardiothoracics. Benton isn’t interested, but Lentloff is eager to change his mind. Susan and Mark get to work at the same time and talk about horrible dates they’ve gone on recently. Obviously these two should just get together, but that’s never going to happen.

On a train after her appointment, Jeanie opens a bill and gets annoyed. Carter’s late for surgery with Benton and Morgenstern, who are discussing Lentloff and Benton’s options for fellowships. Gant is there observing, and Benton tells Carter that Gant stepped in for him because he was late. E-Ray helps Jerry dress up his résumé in case County closes, though Carol points out that there are a few other hospitals that could close instead. Jerry suggests that she get her work history in order, too, but Carol knows she can’t make nursing sound like anything other than nursing.

Carter heads to the ER to do what Gant can’t do while he’s covering for Carter. Weaver tells Mark and Susan that Donald Anspaugh, the chief from Southside, has outlined some good ideas for rearranging the layout of the ER. For example, security should be closer, as it took them four minutes to help Carol, Lydia, and Haleh with their high patient. I have news for you, Weaver: Security will never get better, no matter how close they are to the patients.

Jeanie finds Al on a job site to confront him for having his medical treatments billed to her insurance. His new boss doesn’t give benefits, and Al is trying to work things out with COBRA. Jeanie’s unwilling to keep him on her insurance while he gets his own, since she has her own bills to worry about. As Carter and Carol receive an elderly patient, Doug tells Carol that her car is being towed away. She runs to the tow truck and learns that the car is being repossessed since she missed three payments.

Doug tries to get out of meeting his latest girlfriend’s parents, though he tells Jerry and Randi that she’s a friend from college. Randi tells Carol that she knows some guys who can track down the repo man, if she wants. I feel like Randi knows a lot of guys who can do a lot of things. A couple of teenagers Mark was supposed to talk to complain to Carol about how long they’ve had to wait. Carol takes them to the trauma room where Mark is doing something important and whines at him, only to be told to take the kids back to the waiting room. Come on, Carol.

Carter’s elderly patient has abdominal pains but is also disoriented and keeps yelling for someone named Thomas. The man’s home health-care nurse dumps him on the hospital and leaves for the weekend. Benton doesn’t think the patient needs surgery, so he advises Carter to dump the patient as well and go do something surgical.

Carol apologizes for being a brat earlier, then asks Mark if she can borrow his motorcycle. She has to be home at 3 for some reason, and she has no car, obviously, and won’t be able to catch the El. She takes Susan to meet the waiting teens, who had a mishap during sex and have misplaced their condom. Well, it’s not really misplaced. The girl definitely knows exactly where it is. She just won’t be able to extract it on her own.

Morgenstern tells Mark and Weaver that he has no idea which hospital is going to be closed. There’s going to be an announcement that afternoon. Anspaugh called Morgenstern to discuss the situation, panicking that he’s going to lose his job. Weaver likes Anspaugh, but Morgenstern has only horror stories to tell about him. He apparently hates everyone and won’t hesitate to act on personal grievances.

Doug admits that he knew Carol’s car was being repo’d, not towed. She calls him a coward for not telling her. He offers her a loan, but Carol has a plan in the works already – she’s going to sell her money pit of a house. Mark passes word to Susan that there’s a meeting at 5 to announce which hospital is being shut down. Susan just doesn’t want the news to affect her vacation, as she’s decided to go to Hawaii.

Betty shows up in the ER just as Manny, who runs the “roach coach” coffee cart outside, throws up on the admit desk. Thanks, show. Jeanie’s next patient, a boy named Alex, needs stitches, but she’s a little hesitant now that her blood can be dangerous for others. Speaking of dangerous, Carter gives Betty an oxygen tank, which is going to be fun since she keeps smoking. Carter’s elderly patient, Heath, flatlines, but Carter is able to revive him. Carol and Malik are pleased with his quick work. Benton arrives after Carter’s shown his stuff and is just annoyed that Carter hasn’t dumped Heath on someone else yet.

Carol rides Mark’s motorcycle home to meet a real estate agent, Mrs. Puro. Carol’s mother Helen is also there, and has told Mrs. Puro that Carol’s not selling. Carol says she is, but Mrs. Puro gives it to her straight: “I couldn’t sell this house if the rest of Chicago burned down around it.” It needs too much work, and even if Carol were able to fix it all up, no one’s going to want to live next to the El tracks. Mrs. Puro can’t believe Carol herself ever did.

Carter preps a hernia patient named Hartley for surgery while the patient chatters nervously. Carter advises Hartley to have local anesthesia instead of general so he can stay awake and talk to the surgeon during the procedure, since that will help him stay calm. I’m sure this recommendation is only for the patient’s benefit and not at all because the surgeon is Benton, and Carter knows that having to talk to the patient the whole time will drive him crazy.

Doug teases Susan about her bad recent date, then mentions that she has another date tonight, so Mark can laugh about it with him. Helen thinks that Carol wants to sell her house because it makes her think of Shep. Carol says she hadn’t even though of that. She’s enjoying living on her own; she just can’t afford it. Helen suggests that she call her uncle, who’s made a lot of money in real estate. At the very least, he’ll enjoy Carol’s company. Also, he’s sick and old and rich, and he has to leave his money to someone…

Carter’s revenge on Benton works perfectly, and in no time at all, Benton is fed up. Gant tries to distract Hartley with conversation, but Hartley takes more of Carter’s advice, asking about anatomy. Weaver and Mark head to the meeting where the closing announcement will be made. They were supposed to keep it quiet, but Mark told Susan, and Weaver told a bunch of people. Heath now thinks Carter is Thomas, and whispers something that makes Carter laugh.

The big meeting starts, and the woman running it cuts right to the chase: Southside is closing. Some staff members are coming to County, including Anspaugh, who will be the new chief of staff (since County’s current chief is retiring). News spreads through the hospital, and the staff celebrates at the admit desk. Mark notes that everyone’s happier than they’ve looked in a long time. Jeanie points out that they’re especially happy for people who get thrown up on for a living.

Carol has returned for the party, and asks Carter who he thinks Thomas was – Heath’s son? Carter thinks Thomas was Heath’s dog. The thing he whispered to Carter was, “Kibble, kibble, kibble, kibble.” Weaver calls Jerry from the lounge to let him know that Morgenstern isn’t coming to the celebration. He’s moping because he has to work for Anspaugh and thinks things are going to change for the worse. He tries to cheer himself up by asking Weaver on a date. She accepts! This is so weird! Maybe she doesn’t know it’s a date.

Susan runs away as Anspaugh approaches so Mark will have to talk to him alone. Mark flees, too, because he’s a chicken. Anspaugh puts on some jazz. Malik has a special patient for Carter and Carol – Heath’s nurse, who dumped him at the hospital. They scare him with all the possible health problems he might have and all the things they’ll need to do, starting with a barium enema.

Doug tries to butter up a co-worker named Heather, who’s annoyed that he’s canceled on her in the past. She gives in, because…I mean, have you seen him? Carol tells Jeanie that she was glad to help Carter have some fun, since Benton’s been so hard on him lately. Well, not just lately, but yeah, he’s been worse since Carter graduated.

Mark and his date run into Susan and her date out on the waterfront. The dates quickly hit it off with each other. Weaver, Jeanie, Carol, and Connie take a patient who should have gone to Southside if they hadn’t already closed to traumas. When the patient starts bleeding as Benton arrives, he tells Jeanie to leave. Weaver nicely (especially for her) sends Jeanie on an errand to cover up the fact that Benton decided on his own that he doesn’t need her help.

Susan and Mark’s dates may have ditched them, which Susan says will at least be a good story for them to eventually tell their grandchildren. The two of them take some pictures in a photo booth. Jeanie comes back to the trauma room (after the patient dies) and tells Benton to never treat her like that again. Benton doesn’t want her to put patients at risk, even though the odds of transmitting HIV through their work is so small. Jeanie asks if he would have quit his job if he’d tested positive. Benton says yes, and Jeanie points out that it’s a moot point, since he’s not the one who has to live with the disease. He leaves her there alone.

Thoughts: Betty is played by the late Eileen Brennan.

What would be worse, the anxiety involved in being rendered unconscious for surgery, or staying awake and having to experience (and remember) everything involved? I think I would want to be knocked out.

Mark, maybe you’re not having any luck with dating because you’re wearing scrub pants on your dates.

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