January 22, 2019

ER 3.6, Fear of Flying: Malpractice Makes Perfect

Posted in TV tagged , , , , at 4:54 pm by Jenn

How do these doctors not get sued more often?

Summary: Susan and Mark are about to fly out to a trauma scene on a helicopter, and Susan is less than enthusiastic. She doesn’t have a choice, though, since participating is a requirement for her residency. William tries to explain string theory to Carol at Doc Magoo’s, but she, like me, has no idea what he’s talking about. Mark enjoys the scenery during the helicopter flight, trying to convince Susan to open her eyes. They come to the trauma scene, a bad car crash, and see that they’re the first medical responders.

Things are chaotic at County, where Jeanie’s patient, Mr. Brazil, has some interesting plans for what happens to him after he dies: He wants to be cryogenically frozen. His wife already has been, so he’ll be able to join her. Mr. Brazil’s caretaker tells Jeanie that the couple wanted to be preserved together so they can eventually come back, “just like those dinosaurs in that movie.” Well, yeah. That worked out well for everyone.

The nurses are especially swamped, partly because Haleh’s on vacation. A floater is coming down to fill in, but Lydia doesn’t have high hopes about that; the last time they had a floater, she spent her shift hiding in the bathroom. When they learn that the floater is Rhonda Sterling, Lydia and Chuny refuse to babysit her, knowing that since she’s a floor nurse, she won’t know what she’s doing in the ER.

At the accident scene, Susan tries to tend to three patients, a woman named Gail and her two children. Her daughter, who’s only ten days old, seems mostly fine, but Gail and her son Zach have some injuries. Mark declares the other driver dead, then moves on to try to help Gail’s husband, David. As paramedics and firefighters arrive, Mark summons Susan over to help with David. She tells him the rest of the family is stable.

Jerry’s making sports bets, which would appear to be the dumb sub-sub-subplot of the week, but it’s actually not. Rhonda arrives in the midst of the ER chaos, almost as unenthusiastic about working there as Susan was about flying. Zach stops breathing, so Susan rushes back to him and intubates him. She and the other flight physician she’s working with don’t have the proper tools to do everything they need to do.

Rhonda can’t get an IV started, so she asks Doyle to do it. Carol tells her that nurses in the ER try a few times before turning to a doctor. She’s quickly growing annoyed with Rhonda’s methods and lack of knowledge about ER procedures. As Zach and David are about to be taken to County in the helicopter, Susan takes a moment to tell Gail that she’ll get word to her as soon as she knows their conditions.

The nurses at County prepare for David and Zach’s arrivals as Mr. Brazil’s caretaker says her final goodbye to his body. She asks Jeanie and Connie to keep his body cold until the cryogenic-storage people can come get it. Connie wonders if she should clear out the fridge. Mark and Susan deliver their patients to the ER, and Carol and Doug start taking care of Zach. Rhonda is way behind the curve, and I don’t get why they even brought her into the trauma room.

Susan asks Lydia to track down Gail at whatever hospital she’s being taken to, so Susan can keep in touch with her. A medication mix-up, thanks to Rhonda, leads Carol to accidentally inject Zach with a small amount of potassium. Doug decides that it’s not enough to cause damage, stopping the two women from panicking. Carter comes in for an assessment and gives Keaton all the proper information. He’s completely on top of things, impressing Doug. Next door, David wakes up but doesn’t remember being in the accident.

Carol chastises Rhonda for her mistake, saying she has no business working in the ER. This isn’t news to Rhonda. She’s assigned to restock supplies for the rest of her shift. Jeanie tells Mark about Mr. Brazil and how she’s supposed to figure out the logistics with the cryogenics company. I don’t think medical school prepared Mark for having to deal with this type of situation. Susan learns that Gail and the baby are still at the accident scene, so she may have to fly back out to get them.

Keaton and Benton operate on Zach, with an assist from Carter. Keaton’s pleased with all the steps Benton plans to take. As Susan is called back up on the helicopter, Jeanie starts covering Mr. Brazil’s body in ice. This is the dumb sub-sub-subplot of the week. Doyle doubts that the body will stay cold until a rep from the cryogenics company can arrive. Mark offers to take Susan’s place on the helicopter, but she says she’s okay to suck it up and fly again.

As soon as Zach is out of surgery, Keaton invites Benton to join her for another procedure. Carter thinks she’s awesome. Gail and the baby, Megan, finally arrive at County, and Megan would like to speak to someone in charge about her horrible day. Jeanie and Doyle go across the street to Doc Magoo’s in search of more ice. Meanwhile, actual living patients just sit around the waiting room, totally fine with their ailments taking backseat to a corpse.

Gail’s injuries aren’t too bad, but her extended separation from her husband and kids is taking a toll on her. Gant tries to determine whether Megan needs surgery, but he can’t be sure – her abdomen may be distended because of an injury, or just because she’s been crying so much that she’s swallowed a lot of air. Benton takes over, criticizing Gant for not doing a full surgical evaluation. He decides that Megan needs surgery and at least softens long enough to explain things to Gail.

Gail’s distraught and wants David (a pediatrician) to decide whether they should consent to the surgery. Susan assures her that she’ll make the right decision. After she gives consent, Doug tells Benton that Gant was doing fine with his assessment before Benton barged in. When Keaton joins the group, she tells Gant that missing Megan’s injury was an easy mistake to make. She invites him to scrub in on her surgery.

Jeanie and Doyle are finishing up with Mr. Brazil’s icing when a cryogenics rep arrives to transport his body. He tells the women to give Mr. Brazil heparin, but Jeanie isn’t sure she should obey, since the rep doesn’t appear to be a doctor. Doyle points out that the heparin won’t hurt Mr. Brazil, since he’s, you know, already dead. Keaton, Benton, and Gant operate on Megan, discovering that she has an additional injury they didn’t see earlier.

David appears to be doing better, but Mark and Susan quickly determine that he has a problem with his short-term memory. Carter summons Keaton to help with Zach, who’s getting worse in recovery, so Keaton leaves Benton to finish Megan’s operation on his own. He sees something on the surface of her liver and decides he can clear it out himself. This leads to some bleeding, so Benton has to change his plans. Gant is uncertain about helping out.

Keaton figures out what Zach’s problem is and fixes it without any further medical intervention. Carter’s so in love with her. Things are going downhill with Megan, but Benton won’t let anyone go get Keaton. Eventually things get bad enough that he gives in and lets Gant go. Mark and Susan tell Gail that while David’s tests are okay, he has some memory loss; it’s probably just temporary, and a normal complication with a concussion.

Keaton returns to Megan’s OR and finishes her surgery, annoyed with Benton for his screw-up. Mark and Susan take Gail to take David, who’s starting to recover his memories of the accident. Keaton yells at Benton as she rushes to save Megan. While Mark and Susan are weird and awkward around each other for no apparent reason, Carol tells Rhonda that she can’t work in the ER again. I don’t think Rhonda’s too upset about that. Susan takes Gail to see Zach, who hasn’t regained consciousness yet after surgery. Gail hasn’t heard anything about Megan, so Susan goes to gather information.

Megan’s out of surgery but isn’t doing well. Keaton blames herself for leaving Benton unsupervised, though the real problem is that Benton ignored her instructions. He denies that he did; he did the same thing he’s done with other patients. Keaton reminds him that infants are different from other patients. He’s new to pediatric surgery, so he doesn’t know what he’s doing yet. He should have called her as soon as there was a problem. If Megan dies, Keaton will be held responsible, but it’ll be Benton’s fault.

Megan starts crashing, and when Benton tries to help Keaton with her, Keaton says it’s no longer a teaching case. She doesn’t want to take the baby back to the OR, but she can bring the OR to Megan. Mark gives David an update on Zach, but he doesn’t know anything about Megan. As David is taken to the ICU, Carol tells Mark that Megan’s crashing. He joins Susan outside the makeshift OR as Keaton is able to stabilize Megan. She tells Benton to accompany her to give an update to David and Gail.

Gant tries to sympathize with Benton, who doesn’t want to hear his half-hearted “we’re all human; we all make mistakes.” Gant takes a different tack, telling Benton he’s a prick. Keaton tells Gail about Megan’s condition as Carter fails to hide a look of horror in the background. Keaton is honest with Gail, telling her it’s possible that Megan won’t survive. Benton says nothing, which is a good idea. He goes to the neonatal ICU and tries to say the Lord’s Prayer over Megan, but he can’t remember the words.

Thoughts: Rhonda is played by Jenny O’Hara.

I love this piece of trivia from IMDb: “The production team were worried that Standards and Practices wouldn’t allow Dr Dennis Gant to call Peter Benton a prick. However, this didn’t prove to be a problem because Standards and Practices clearly agreed with Gant.”

A round of applause to all the actors who had to do their scenes over the sound of Megan’s crying and screaming.

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January 19, 2019

The X-Files 9.8, Hellbound: Under My Skin

Posted in TV tagged , , at 1:11 pm by Jenn

There weren’t a lot of non-gross options for pictures for this episode

Summary: A man is speaking at a support group at a church in Novi, Virginia, telling the other participants how much better he is because he’s been coming there. Another man, Ed, says our lives “only go one way,” and the speaker can’t undo the crimes he’s committed. He’s going to Hell just like everyone else in the group. Ed says he’s only there because he drove a friend, Victor, who isn’t doing well. He’s been having dreams about people being skinned alive.

The group leader, Lisa, is concerned as the first speaker, Terry, tells Victor that everyone there is afraid. That fear often comes out in dreams. After the meeting, Ed tells Victor that the group is useless, and clearly isn’t helping his nightmares. What also doesn’t help: the fact that when Victor looks at Ed, he sees him without his skin.

Reyes is looking at Victor’s criminal file when Doggett meets her in Quantico in the middle of the night. Victor was murdered five days ago. They meet up with Scully, who looks very put together for that time of night. The three agents look at Victor’s skinned body, which Doggett thinks was the work of a gang. Reyes says more has to be going on – Victor was skinned alive just hours after he talked about dreaming about people being skinned.

Doggett figures that a lifelong criminal like Victor had some enemies, and one of them finished him off. He doesn’t get why this is a case for them. Scully says that Victor was skinned in a way that made him suffer for as long as possible. Okay, but that still doesn’t make it an X-File, and Reyes doesn’t even know why she’s feeling like she needs to solve the case. She’s like Scully and Doggett’s help, though.

Doggett and Reyes meet up with a detective named Van Allen, who doesn’t hide his disinterest in the case. They talk to Lisa, who tells them about Ed’s animosity toward Victor at the meeting (which, by the way, was for anger management). She says other stuff about the participants’ pasts. Doggett is surprised that Reyes contacted Lisa about the investigation, not the other way around. Lisa appreciates that someone’s looking into what happened to an otherwise forgettable person like Victor. Van Allen finds Reyes familiar and wonders if she’s ever been to Novi before. She hasn’t.

Ed and Terry both happen to work at Maneri Meat Packing, where Ed gets to spend his days skinning pigs. He only cares about Victor’s death in terms of how it affects him – now Ed gets a promotion. Terry’s annoyed that the FBI wants to talk to them. He accuses Ed of messing with Victor’s head. Ed threatens to cut him, so I guess those anger-management meetings really aren’t helping.

Terry’s pretty sure that Ed killed Victor. He reminds Ed that he said they can’t walk away from who they are. Ed replies that he’ll see Terry in Hell. As Ed leaves for the day, Terry sees someone without skin walking around among hung-up pig slabs. He follows the person outside but only sees Ed.

At Quantico, Scully studies up on skinnings. The cadet who pulled all the case files for her could only find ones about post-mortem skinnings, and most of them are gang-related, as Doggett suspected. But one of the cases involves a victim whose body ended up looking a lot like Victor’s. The case is from 1960.

Scully goes to a retirement home to speak to Dr. Bertram Mueller, the examiner who did the autopsy on the body in 1960. He was a John Doe who was skinned alive, and though Mueller is 84 and must have autopsied thousands of bodies, this one clearly sticks out in his memory. He tells Scully that it was the most inhuman thing he’s ever seen.

Scully can’t find the police records for the case, but Mueller says there was no investigation. Since the victim was a John Doe, the sheriff didn’t bother to look into his murder, for fear of stirring up the community. Not long after that, the sheriff killed himself. Mueller wonders if Victor was murdered by a copycat killer. Scully notes that if that’s the case, the copying is perfect. She doesn’t know why someone would mimic an obscure crime, though. Mueller reveals that the John Doe wasn’t the only victim, just the first.

Terry’s hosing blood off the floor at work when he senses he’s not alone. He thinks Ed is back for a fight, but Terry’s ready with his own knife. He stalks the person in there with him, but the person gets the upper hand and knocks him out. Terry wakes up upside-down, strung among all the pig carcasses. He realizes what he’s in for as his attacker starts…well, gutting him like a pig, I’d say. The good news is that Terry won’t be the one to clean up this blood, since he’ll be dead.

Reyes goes back to see Lisa but instead comes face to face with someone who’s been skinned. It’s really just a nightmare, and Doggett hears her yelling in her sleep and wakes her up. Lisa has called to report that Terry’s dead. They meet Van Allen at the crime scene, and when Reyes sees Terry’s skinned body, it’s too much for her to handle and she has to run outside. There, she runs into Scully, who wants to talk about the 1960 murders.

Doggett’s stomach is stronger than Reyes, and he takes a closer look at Terry’s body. That’s how he discovers that Terry isn’t dead after all. The poor guy is hanging upside-down, surrounded by dead pigs, with all his skin removed, and he’s still alive. He’s barely able to tell Doggett that Ed was his attacker.

Elsewhere in town, Ed kicks out his girlfriend as he packs a bag. She leaves the house and runs right into Doggett, who’s there with a team to capture Ed. For some reason, they allow Lisa to talk to him in an interrogation room at the police station. She thinks he’s innocent – why would he kill two people when his life is going so well? Doggett reminds her that she said he had a bad temper. Plus, he was trying to run; innocent people don’t do that. Reyes thinks he was running from something other than his crimes.

Reyes takes Lisa’s place in the interrogation room and brings up Victor’s dreams about skinned bodies. She thinks Ed is seeing them now – and so is Reyes herself. Doggett pulls her out of the room and chastises her for basically giving Ed a defense to use in court. Yeah, I’m sure the judge will dismiss the case because of nightmares. Anyway, Van Allen tells the agents that Ed’s girlfriend gave him an alibi, and a bartender where they were drinking confirmed her story. Ed’s not the killer. (But he’s also not sober, as Lisa thinks.)

Ed is released, with a warning from Doggett that they know where to find him. Lisa tells Ed he’s always welcome at the group meetings. As he walks past her, Ed sees her without her skin. Scully summons Reyes back to Quantico to look at two of the bodies from 1960. She found cuts on their legs and shoulders, which were made with the same knife used to kill Victor. In addition, the two victims were ex-cons, and the days they were killed were the same days Victor and Terry were born. Scully thinks Reyes knew that something like this would come up in the investigation.

Doggett is staking out Ed’s house when Reyes calls to ask for Ed’s birthday. She thinks he’s going to be the next victim. Doggett calls Van Allen as he heads to the house to see if Ed is still there. He is, but his skin isn’t. Someone was supposed to be watching the house at all times, but the patrolman on duty left for a few minutes. Doggett finds it hard to believe that Ed could have been skinned in just those few minutes.

Reyes tells Doggett about the birthday connection and her theory that the killer isn’t using them to choose his victims. She thinks Ed had a premonition and knew he was going to die, just like Victor did. She has some kind of memory of this happening before. “These men were born to die this way, the same way they died before,” she says. Well, not the men – their souls. They’re killed over and over in different lifetimes by a killer who won’t let them rest.

Doggett asks if she’s suggesting this is reincarnation. He thinks they’re just dealing with a clever killer. But Reyes knows that a rag was stuffed in Ed’s mouth, and that the soot on it is coal dust from a mine. She has no idea how she would know that. But the mine is a lead, so the agents head there expecting to find a fourth victim. Doggett checks out a house on the property while Reyes goes into the mine alone, which can’t be a good idea.

Reyes finds newspaper clippings about the 1960 deaths while Doggett finds a skeleton. The murders go back even further than 1960, and one of the investigators from before that time disappeared. The skeleton is his. The murders began in 1868, when a prospector was skinned in a mining dispute, and his four killers were acquitted. So it looks like someone’s been trying to get revenge for a century and a half because justice wasn’t served.

Reyes continues searching the mine and finds a bunch of bodies hanging on the walls. A man surprises her and tells her she shouldn’t have come there. He grabs her and tells her she can’t stop it – she never does. Doggett goes to the mine and finds Reyes alone. She tells him Van Allen is the killer. He was the first victim in 1868, and he keeps coming back to avenge himself over and over. The cases never get solved because the lead investigator always kills himself, then comes back to start killing again.

There are currently only three victims, but Reyes thinks she knows who the fourth will be. She calls Lisa to confirm that she’s been having the same premonitions as Victor, Ed, and Terry. Reyes tells her that Van Allen is coming for her and she needs to leave the church. Too late – Van Allen is there to do some more skinning.

Lisa tries to run as Van Allen says there’s no point, since this always ends the same. But this time is different, because Reyes and Doggett are a step ahead. They ambush Van Allen, and when he moves to attack Reyes, she shoots him. She demands to know what it all means before he can die.

Van Allen ends up in the hospital, in critical condition. Doggett encourages Reyes to go home since she’s not going to be able to talk to him for a while. Reyes says that Doggett still doesn’t believe that she has a connection to the killings. Doggett says it doesn’t matter; the important thing is that she saved Lisa. Scully tells Reyes that Doggett’s trying to grasp this, but it’s hard to understand.

Reyes asks if Scully believes in second chances and the opportunity to correct our mistakes in another life. She thinks all the victims were trying to atone for the original murder. Scully wonders how Reyes fits into the cycle of murders. Reyes doesn’t know, but she’s sure that she always failed to stop the killings and bring about justice. And she’s sure that Van Allen always knew about her involvement, and knows her worst fear is failing again.

Scully says that maybe in this life, Reyes will succeed. But not today, because Van Allen’s dead, which means he’s free to come back in a few decades and kill again. So the parents of a baby just born down the hall, who has Van Allen’s eyes, are going to be in for a shock in a few years.

Thoughts: Terry is played by Don Swayze, brother of Patrick.

Imagine being cast on this show and then learning that you have to do something like cut off a pig’s skin. I know actors have to pay their dues early in their careers, but that may be going too far.

Also, imagine being in the props department and having to deal with all those pig carcasses. Fake or not, they’re gross.

January 15, 2019

ER 3.5, Ghosts: Benton’s Bedside Manner Is Way Scarier Than Any Ghost

Posted in TV tagged , , , , , , , at 5:06 pm by Jenn

I love this

Summary: It’s Halloween, so when Jeanie stops by Al’s house, she’s joined by some trick-or-treaters. She’s there for tax documents, not candy. At County, Gant complains to Carter that Benton wrote him a bad evaluation. Carter got the exact same evaluation, so he can relate. Jerry’s dressed as a kangaroo, and I wonder if Carol ever told him that she saw it. He reminds her that she has a shift on the hospital’s healthmobile that night. The lights flicker, and Lydia suggests a ghost on the fifth floor is messing around.

Susan’s coming back from Hawaii in a few hours, and Mark plans to welcome her with orange carnations. Chuny asks if he and Doug are coming to a party that night, where Haleh will be singing jazz. She makes Mark think that carnations weren’t the best idea. A man dressed as Frankenstein’s monster is brought in with a gunshot wound, and Weaver works on him with Gant and Carter. She lets Gant run things, and she approves of all his moves. When Benton joins the group, he takes over and makes Gant feel less confident. Carter steps in, and whatever he does makes the patient rise off the table like the monster he’s dressed as.

Carol goes to Malcolm X Community College for her first pre-med physics class. She’s paired with a lab partner, a kid named William who might not even be a teenager yet. He thinks her nurse’s uniform is a costume. Doug is also working in the healthmobile that night, thanks to Anspaugh, and isn’t looking forward to dealing with Chicago’s local nutbar patients out in the field. Chuny says her recent turn in the healthmobile wasn’t that bad. They got shot at, but since the shooters missed, she calls it a success.

Keaton quizzes Benton on children’s developmental milestones, and he proves that he knows nothing about babies. (Just wait, Benton. Your time is coming.) Carter knows all the answers, though Keaton says it’s probably because he did his pediatrics rotation more recently than Benton. Turns out kids don’t like Benton any more than Benton likes kids, so their young patient cries when Benton holds him. Keaton suggests that he try some props to make himself more appealing to kids.

Jeanie and Doyle tend to a woman named Sophie Jennings who’s in the late stages of Lou Gehrig’s and was found unconscious by her husband. She has a DNR, but Jeanie wants to treat her with medication anyway. Doyle objects, but she has to defer to Jeanie, who, as a physician’s assistant, has seniority. Weaver and Anspaugh tell Mark that Weaver’s done some research that should bring in a track. Anspaugh’s pleased that Weaver works for him, and he thinks Mark needs to step up his own research. He suggests something about pus. Mark is understandably…uninspired.

William helps Carol with their labwork, recognizing that she hasn’t taken physics before. He offers to help her with her homework, since he helped his mom when she got her real estate license. Paramedics bring in a ten-year-old girl named Tina who was hit by a car while trick-or-treating with her father. Benton quizzes Gant as they work, then tells Carter to hold the girl’s hand and calm her down (probably so Benton himself doesn’t have to do it). Next door, Mark and Weaver work on Tina’s father, who was injured more severely.

Tests show that Sophie is unconscious because she overdosed on pills in a suicide attempt. Jeanie still wants to work on her, though Doyle still doesn’t see the point – Sophie wanted to die. Jeanie sticks to protocol. Carter continues chatting with Tina as Benton determines that she may need surgery. Weaver signals to Mark that her father didn’t make it, and Mark has Carter run through the process to confirm that he’s dead.

Carol meets the healthmobile driver, Gus, who warns her and Doug that the patients will be expecting cookies. He tells them to go out the back window if anyone shoots at them, and if they get robbed, let the robbers take whatever they want. Doug and Carol aren’t pleased when they learn that they’ll need to wear bulletproof vests.

Jeanie and Doyle tell Sophie’s husband, Mitchell, that she’s in serious condition. He laments how depressed she’s gotten in the past few months, as her Lou Gehrig’s has gotten worse. He’s not surprised that she attempted suicide; he knows she’s been praying to die. Susan comes in fresh from her vacation, feeling very relaxed and refreshed. We all know that won’t last.

Tina asks for her father as she’s taken to surgery. Carter keeps quiet about his death, which Benton thinks is a bad call. Keaton, however, doesn’t want to upset Tina before she goes in for an operation. She then asks Benton to take some of her young patients trick-or-treating around the hospital. Not mentioned: whether these kids’ parents know their children will be spending the evening with a man who has no idea how to take care of kids.

Susan admits to Mark that she never made it to Hawaii. When the plane landed in Phoenix for a layover, she realized she would never be able to get back on. She spent her vacation with Chloe and Susie instead, which to her is just as good as a week in Hawaii. Mark tells her that Anspaugh loves Weaver and is probably going to give her the only open slot for tenure. He asks Susan if she wants to go to the staff party with her that night, making it sound casual and friendly. When she notices the carnations and greets them with, “Yikes,” he says a drug rep brought them in.

Doug checks out the meager supplies on the healthmobile, some of which have been expired for years. He finds a physics book in Carol’s bag, and she lies that it belongs to a friend. The healthmobile arrives in the inner city, where people are lined up to get free healthcare. The first patient won’t even tell them what’s wrong with him until he gets a cookie.

Mitchell sits by Sophie’s bed, telling Jeanie that she fixed herself up that morning, then told her husband that she was ready. He admits that he helped her take the pills. He got scared and called the ambulance, and feels that he was too weak to help her when she needed him to. He’s not ready to lose her.

Benton goes to the hospital gift shop to get some props, like a little animal that sits in your pocket and somehow makes kids think you’re not scary. Anspaugh catches him there and says that Keaton sends all the residents who don’t like kids there to get their “props.” Benton says he likes kids, and somehow Anspaugh doesn’t laugh in his face.

Doug treats a stripper who teases that she recognizes him. He’s insistent that they’ve never met, but with him, you never know. Suddenly a preteen girl named Charlie runs onto the healthmobile, yelling that she was stabbed. As Doug and Carol start to treat her, she reveals that she was just playing a Halloween prank. She asks for a cookie, and when she’s denied, she asks for condoms. She says she’s 18, but she’s definitely lying. Doug and Carol realize she’s turning tricks, but there’s not much they can do for her other than give her condoms.

Back at the hospital, the lights are still flickering. Susan’s with Lydia about the ghost being responsible. She tells the story behind the ghost – on Halloween 60 or so years ago, a doctor fell in love with an intern, but the intern was torn between him and a wealthy patient. When the intern went to the doctor for his declaration of love, he couldn’t get the words out. Then somehow, he wound up falling through a window. Jerry, Lily, Chuny, and Lydia are captivated by the story, but Mark dismisses it.

Carter goes to check on Tina, who’s doing well after her surgery. He offers to sit with her until her mother arrives. Keaton asks him to call her when Tina wakes up so she can tell Tina her father died. Carter wants to do that himself. Doug and Carol get a stabbing victim – a real one this time – but no one in the vicinity will tell them what happened. They use their limited supplies to tend to him, even with the threat of gunfire nearby. An ambulance won’t make it there for a while, so they decide to take the healthmobile.

Sophie dies, and Jeanie tells Mitchell he can sit with her body for a while. He isn’t sure if he did the right thing by helping her die, since this isn’t the sort of people they are. Jeanie thinks he showed who he is by staying with Sophie and giving her what she needed. Doug and Carol work on the stabbing victim in their substitute ambulance, overcoming the obstacles their supplies throw their way.

Benton continues giving Gant his scut work, and Gant finally asks why Benton keeps treating him so badly. He works his hardest, but Benton only gave him a mediocre evaluation. Benton notes that most interns only do mediocre work. Gant thinks everyone in their group does the same level of work, but Benton singles him out.

Benton reminds him that, as a black doctor, he has to work harder than everyone else. He asks Gant if he checked the box on his med-school application identifying himself as black. If he did, people will assume that he did it to get preferential treatment. They’ll also assume that he’s there to fill a quota. He has to work harder and stay longer to prove himself. Gant knows all that, and he asks Benton if he checked the box. Benton says no, but Gant thinks he’s trying to prove himself as if he had.

When Tina wakes up, Carter starts to tell her that her father died, but she already knows that he’s dead. Doug and Carol get their patient to the hospital, advising Malik to bring cookies when he takes his turn on the healthmobile next week. Doug tells Carol that if she does want to go to med school, he’ll support her decision. If he can make it through, she can.

Doyle tells Jeanie that she wishes they could have saved Sophie so Mitchell won’t have to be alone. She’s at rest, but he’s in pain now. Mark has to go to the fifth floor to pronounce a patient’s death, so he takes Susan with him “for protection.” Benton takes some energetic patients trick-or-treating, his idea of a Halloween trick. Mark and Susan do their work behind a curtain, so we only see their shadows, like an old monster movie. She swears she feels a cold wind, and he teases her about it.

Carter tells Keaton that Tina knew about her father’s death before he could tell her. She felt him with her during surgery, and he told her goodbye. Keaton says that sometimes kids just know that sort of thing. Carter had a similar experience – when he was a kid, he sensed the moment his brother died. Benton loses his kids when he takes one to the bathroom, because he sucks at this.

Haleh sings “Love Potion Number 9” at the staff party, where everyone’s having a great time. Well, except Mark, who can’t stop complaining about how Weaver seems to be kissing up to Anspaugh. Susan tells him to do something other than work, since it’s become his whole life. Benton finds his missing kids, who want to know if he was ever a fun-loving kid before he became a grumpy adult. He tells them that when he was younger, they had to do tricks to get treats. The kids demand one, so he stands on his head. The kids aren’t impressed, but Keaton is.

Jeanie goes to Doc Magoo’s to meet up with Al and give him back the tax documents. She tells him that neither of them ever changed – he’s always been a lousy husband, and she just put up with it for years. Seeing Mitchell do anything Sophie needed, including helping her die, has made her realize how awful their marriage was: “And now you’ve killed me.” As Haleh sings “Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered,” Susan and Mark contemplate going out to get food, then decide to dance instead.

Thoughts: Charlie is played by Kirsten Dunst.

Props to Laura Cerón for wearing big curlers in her hair for the whole episode, since Chuny’s costume is herself getting ready in the morning.

Benton has three nieces and nephews – how can he be so clueless about children’s milestones?

 

January 12, 2019

The X-Files 9.7, John Doe: La Verdad Está Ahí Afuera

Posted in TV tagged , , , at 1:24 pm by Jenn

I’m not going to lie, this look really works for Robert Patrick

Summary: We know this is a special episode because it comes with title screens. On Day One, Doggett wakes up on a dirt floor in an abandoned building. Someone steals his shoe, and Doggett chases him outside and onto a street in what Hollywood always thinks Mexico looks like. As Doggett tries to steal his shoe back, the thief calls to some police officers. They’re not happy with the thief, but they’re more interested in Doggett and whether he has papers. Ooh, the Mexican police want papers from a white guy! Twist! Unfortunately, Doggett doesn’t have any. Even more unfortunately, he can’t remember his name.

Day Two. Doggett is in a holding cell with a bunch of other people. To add insult to injury, he still only has one shoe. He thinks that yelling “andale” will make the police pay attention to him, but he’s wrong. One of the other prisoners mocks Doggett for taking his single shoe off to hit the bars of their cell, then putting the shoe back on. Doggett’s pleased to have found someone who speaks English. The guy tells him they’re in Mexico and asks what he remembers. Doggett just wants to get out of jail and call the American embassy.

The guy points out that from there, Doggett will have trouble getting home, since he doesn’t know where home is. He thinks going home might not be a good idea anyway, since Doggett is in a part of Mexico that Americans don’t come to unless they want to disappear. Doggett gets defensive, saying the guy doesn’t know him. “You don’t know you,” the guy points out.

Doggett has a dream about his son, Luke, calling for him. Then we skip ahead to Day Eight. The guy who speaks English (Domingo) is released from the holding cell, and after he learns from the police that no one’s coming for Doggett, he offers to bail Doggett out. Domingo has a job for Doggett but won’t give him any details, knowing Doggett won’t care as long as he gets his freedom. If he works hard enough, Domingo might get him another shoe.

Once he’s free, Doggett says goodbye to Domingo, but Domingo sees Doggett as his property now. Doggett tries to run, but Domingo has a buddy, Nestor, and Nestor has a gun, which he sticks in Doggett’s back. Doggett disarms Nestor and takes the gun (and his other shoe). Domingo notes that, if nothing else, they now know that Doggett isn’t a man of his word.

Doggett tracks down the shoe thief and asks what else he stole from Doggett. All he gets is a little silver skull charm. The thief tells Doggett that he’s disappeared. Out of options, Doggett finds Domingo in a bar and agrees to work for him. The job is as a coyote, moving people across the border. Domingo doesn’t think Doggett is above the job, since he must have done something horrible to lead him to needing it.

Domingo pays Doggett in advance so he can rent a room above the bar. Doggett shows Domingo the skull and asks if it means anything. All it means is that Doggett has silver and still asked Domingo for money. Nestor warns Domingo that he’s making a mistake; he doesn’t know what Doggett wants. Domingo says he just wants to remember, “same as all the rest.”

Doggett studies his face in the mirror of his room, seeing two little scars on his head. He realizes that the tattoo on his shoulder means he’s a Marine. Elsewhere, we get a glimpse of the Mexican version of CSM, whose charm bracelet is missing a little silver skull.

Day 12. In D.C., Scully and Skinner meet with Kersh to tell him that they’ve gotten word from U.S. Customs. There’s a surveillance photo of Doggett walking across the border from Laredo, Texas, into Mexico. Apparently Americans can just walk into Mexico? They should put some sort of barrier there to keep that from happening. I don’t know what it could be; I don’t have any ideas there. Skinner wants to send a task force there, but Kersh refuses. They’ve been searching Texas for Doggett, and now it looks like he just walked away. He’s Mexico’s problem now.

Scully argues that Doggett could be injured and could need their help. Kersh says he’s as concerned as she is (yeah, I bet), but he can’t use American resources to search Mexico. There’s too much political stuff he’d have to deal with. Skinner notes that Reyes is in San Antonio and was raised in Mexico, so she could help. Kersh says she can do whatever she wants, as long as she stays in the U.S.

So Reyes uses the FBI’s San Antonio field office to bug a Mexican businessman named Molina. He’s been dodging her for two weeks, claiming he’s been too busy with his tractor dealership to help. Reyes addresses him in Spanish, asking if he also sells drugs. Molina’s American lawyer objects to the language switch, since he doesn’t speak Spanish.

Reyes asks Molina about a missing businessman named Hollis Rice. Doggett was investigating his disappearance, and Reyes thinks he questioned Molina two weeks ago. Molina says he doesn’t remember talking to anyone named Doggett. Molina’s lawyer says his client is an upstanding citizen and a pillar of the community. Reyes asks if anyone actually uses that phrase other than mob lawyers. (Nice one.) She thinks Molina runs a smuggling operation, and Rice was involved somehow, then disappeared because he crossed Molina.

Reyes continues that Doggett is also missing in Mexico, and she’ll do anything it takes to get him back. Molina’s only hope is to help her. The lawyer calls an end to the interrogation, unless Molina is under arrest. He’s not, so they leave. Reyes gets the last word, telling Molina in Spanish that he should think hard about his future.

Doggett has another dream about Luke. The boy wakes him up at 5:30 in the morning, eager to show him something. Before Doggett can find out what the surprise is, he’s woken up by a ringing phone. He’s fallen asleep in the waiting room of some office where he’s waiting to use the phone. Doggett calls the Marine Corps Public Affairs Office and, lying that his name is Detective Ladatel (the first word he sees on a sign nearby), ask for help with an amnesiac Marine who was hit by a taxi. He uses info from his tattoo to try to help ID himself.

Police enter, so Doggett runs off. He goes to work, fixing trucks for Domingo since he refuses to do anything further as a coyote. Domingo has found a missing-persons flier for Henry Bruck, a suspected murderer. Though the flier doesn’t contain a picture or any details, Domingo figures it’s Doggett. He promises to keep Doggett safe.

That night, Nestor meets with the Mexican CSM (we’ll call him HF, for Hombre Fumando). He says that he and Domingo are friends of HF’s cartel, and Domingo has taken in a disappeared American who’s different from all the others. He knows that HF already knows all this. Actually, HF knows even more than that – he knows Doggett is an FBI agent.

Nestor asks why Doggett is still alive. HF says he takes his orders from the cartel, and his orders never said to kill Doggett. Ahh, I get it. The cartel isn’t a drug cartel – it’s the Mexican version of the Syndicate. HF continues that if Doggett were to die tonight, it wouldn’t be any of his concern.

Scully goes to San Antonio and tells Reyes that Skinner’s on his way to Mexico to work with the feds there to find Doggett. She’s learned that the Marines are looking for an unidentified man in Mexico. Reyes recognizes Doggett’s alias, Ladatel, as a Mexican phone calling card, not a name. They decide to trace the call Doggett placed to the Marines.

Nestor corners Doggett at the garage, where he’s working under a truck. Nestor reveals that he speaks English and tells Doggett, “See you in Hell, FBI.” He pulls a gun and fires at Doggett, who releases the jack holding up the truck so the truck blocks him from getting shot and injures Nestor’s foot at the same time. Hey, if Doggett hadn’t gotten his other shoe back, he could take Nestor’s! Doggett hides, then pounces on Nestor as he’s trying to get off another shot.

Domingo returns to the garage and finds Nestor dead. Doggett accuses Domingo of sending Nestor to kill him. He thinks Domingo knows who he is. Domingo says he’s a killer, for starters, since he killed Nestor. He calls Doggett a “desaparecido,” someone the cartel makes disappear. They run the town and kill people who make trouble. People who are more trouble dead than alive get their memories taken away.

Doggett asks how he can get his memory back. Domingo says he can’t. But Doggett’s dreams are clearly some sort of glitch in the process, because they’re breaking through his amnesia. While Doggett is distracted by a memory, Domingo starts pounding on him.

Reyes questions a police officer, pretending Doggett is her husband who abandoned her and their kids. He tells her that he and his fellow officers found an American who had been beaten to death. She asks to see the body, but it’s not Doggett (probably Henry Bruck, then). However, he does have the same scars on his head that Doggett has.

Domingo goes to HF to tell him that Nestor is dead. He knows that Nestor wouldn’t have tried to kill Doggett without HF’s permission. Domingo has overpowered Doggett and wants HF to have the honor of finishing him off. HF asks what Domingo told Doggett when he inevitably asked about his identity and his memories. Domingo says he didn’t reveal anything, but HF doesn’t believe him. He wants to see the truth with his own eyes. By this, he means use his eyes, which are now glowing, to remove Domingo’s memories from his head.

Doggett wakes up (this is turning into a drinking game) in the garage as a car arrives. He grabs a tire iron to use as a weapon and almost clocks Reyes over the head with it. He grabs her gun and holds it on her, unsure if he can believe her when she tells him they need to leave. He’ll need to make a decision quickly, because the police are there to kill him on behalf of the cartel.

Doggett thinks he and Reyes can just hide and wait for the cops to get bored. (I will not call it a Mexican standoff. I will not.) He tells her the only thing he can remember is his son. Reyes tells him the boy’s name was Luke. Doggett asks how old Luke is, and Reyes realizes sadly that she’ll have to tell him that Luke is dead. Her face says it all, but Doggett remembers that Luke was kidnapped and murdered.

As Doggett is crying over Luke’s death, the police throw a smoke canister through the window. Reyes tells her partner he needs to focus. The police start firing into the garage, which is really not a place the agents should be hiding out, with all that gas around. Reyes tells Doggett that they can’t die there. There’s a bus in the garage, so they board it and try to use it to escape, but Doggett’s driving abilities must have been removed with all of his other memories, because he tips it over just a few yards from the police.

Before the police can resume shooting, the feds arrive, led by Skinner, and stop the standoff. Well, that was anticlimactic. Doggett returns the skull to HF and accuses him of taking away his identity. He now knows he was in Mexico looking for Rice, who suffered the same memory loss as Doggett. But HF failed with Doggett, who now remembers everything.

Skinner tells Doggett to leave so the other agents can detain HF. But HF stops Doggett when he asks why Doggett would want to remember his past. There’s no way he’s happier now that he remembers. HF saw all the pain Doggett has suffered and doesn’t know why he’d want it back. “Because it’s mine,” Doggett replies.

With his memories fully restored, Doggett can now fill in the rest of the scene he kept dreaming about. Luke wanted to show him that he could ride his bike on his own. He should be wearing a helmet, unless he wants to end up with amnesia like his father, but whatever, good for him. Reyes is sorry that Doggett had to go through all that pain, but Doggett is fine remembering the bad as long as he can also remember the good.

Thoughts: In a couple of Doggett’s dreams/memories, we see his wife in bed with him when Luke comes in. She’s played by Barbara Patrick, Robert Patrick’s real-life wife.

Hey, show, don’t cast a white actress to play a character with the last name Reyes, then pretend she grew up in Mexico and is fluent in Spanish. Annabeth Gish’s accent gives away her lack of fluency.

Domingo: “I’d invite you to have a drink with us, but Nestor hates you.” For some reason, that cracked me up.

I hope Scully’s okay. She disappears after she gets to Mexico. Maybe she found a fun bar and spent the rest of the case doing tequila shots.

January 8, 2019

ER 3.4, Last Call: Who Thought All That Womanizing and Partying Would Have Negative Consequences?

Posted in TV tagged , , , , , at 4:51 pm by Jenn

Oh, just get back together already

Summary: Doug’s asleep – drink! He brought a woman home last night, and she’s trying to leave at 6 a.m., but she’s not completely sober and has some trouble with the door. Doug wants to get her a cab, which the date thinks is chivalrous. Doyle is chipper when she arrives for work, where Carter and Gant are still down in the dumps. At least Carter’s white coat looks nice…though it’s because his family’s maid cleaned it, since he’s had to move back home after his apartment building burned down. Gant invites him to move in with him. Carter’s supposed to provide slides for a presentation Benton’s giving that day, but they burned up in the fire.

Doug drives his date home, declining to turn back when she realizes she left some of her things at his place. He would rather do anything in the world other than spent an extra second with her. Suddenly, the date starts foaming at the mouth. Doug rushes her to the hospital to get her treated for seizures. He has to admit to Carol that he doesn’t know her name.

Mark, Weaver, Carol, and Doyle tend to Doug’s date, who’s still seizing after half an hour. Weaver and Mark want to intubate her, though Doug thinks that might be premature. He heads to the car to see if he can find an ID. Carter’s late to the seminar Anspaugh is conducting, and doesn’t get a chance to tell Benton that he doesn’t have the slides for his presentation. He doesn’t get to come clean until after Benton has started. Anspaugh and Keaton are unimpressed.

Weaver tells Mark that they’re starting a pilot study where they’ll split up medical and surgical cases. She gives him medical cases, and Mark enlists Doyle to work with him. Jeanie hides out in a bathroom so she can take her HIV meds in secret. They’re taking a toll on her, but she tells Connie her fall allergies are acting up.

Carter tries to apologize to Benton for the slides, but he only has until the next morning to replace them. As he’s leaving, Keaton joins them and starts talking about Laura-Lee, one of Benton’s patients. She thinks Carter should be more involved in Laura-Lee’s case. Doug searches his car as Weaver admonishes Jerry and Lydia for gossiping about Doug and his date. He’s found an ID and now knows her name is Nadine, but it doesn’t really matter – while he was outside, Nadine died.

Instead of going home, Doug decides to stick around and work his scheduled shift. He tells Mark that he feels bad for what happened to Nadine, but he is in no way responsible. He thinks Mark is judging him for sleeping with a woman he barely knew – whose name he didn’t even know. Mark tells him that Nadine’s tox screen showed that she used cocaine. Doug swears that he had no idea she was doing drugs, and he definitely wasn’t partaking. Mark tells him to take a drug test anyway.

Carol thinks Mark should back off of Doug, since he’s going to do whatever he wants anyway. Benton tries to keep Carter at a distance, but Carter thinks Keaton wanted him to assist with Laura-Lee’s surgery that afternoon, so he’s not going anywhere. When they go in to see Laura-Lee, an angry teenager, it’s Carter who connects with her better than Benton (of course). She wants to leave without her surgery, but obviously Carter’s going to change her mind.

E-Ray invites Carol to come to a yoga class he teaches at Malcolm X Community College. Doyle reveals that she did her first year of med school there; their night program is prestigious. Doug puts his tox-screen results in Mark’s box, then asks Carol if anyone’s looking for Nadine’s medical records. The two of them then tend to a preteen victim of a gunshot wound.

Jeanie calls her doctor to ask for advice on dealing with the side effects of her medication. Weaver checks on her, but Jeanie doesn’t admit that she’s not feeling well. Weaver asks her to take a patient with a fractured ankle, noting that the nurses are deciding who will assist her. They draw tongue depressors to determine that Wendy gets the job, though Jeanie’s not sure why she’s so happy about it. It turns out that the patient, McKenna, was brought in by a handsome buddy named Mickey, the real draw for the job.

Weaver wants to discuss Doug with Mark, knowing that Nadine tested positive for cocaine. Doug’s tox screen was negative, so Mark has no problem with him working his shift. Weaver notes that he could have been drinking. Plus, he’s putting a chest tube in a 12-year-old, so maybe they should keep an eye on him. She observes while Doug does everything perfectly, then asks Carol what the hourly rate for babysitting is.

Keaton compliments Benton on calming Laura-Lee down and getting her to agree to her surgery. Benton gives the credit to Carter, so Keaton rewards Carter by letting him scrub in. As Doug and Carol finish up with the 12-year-old, two police officers approach to talk to Doug about Nadine. Mark accidentally interrupts, and the cops invite him to stick around, so he’s there when Doug says they left after last call at a bar. He swears again that he didn’t have anything to do with the drugs Nadine was using.

Benton does well in Laura-Lee’s surgery, but Keaton’s more interested in talking to Carter. He explains that he got Laura-Lee to agree to the operation by writing her a pass from gym class. He knew that she would be uncomfortable changing in the locker room while she has an ostomy bag, but he assured her that it would be gone by November, when she has to play in the marching band at a championship game.

Mickey’s hanging around, waiting for McKenna to be discharged, and being closely tended to by the nurses. He tells them he teaches country dancing, so Haleh and Lydia ask him to show them some moves. Carol tells a 15-year-old named Jung Koo that she’s not pregnant, but she needs to have a pelvic exam. Doug thinks he can handle things, but Carol wants to do it herself, since Jung Koo is hesitant to trust anyone else. Doug accuses Carol of second-guessing him. Mark pulls rank and sends Doyle to help Carol with the exam.

Doug confronts Mark for continuing to be cool toward him even after his tox screen came back clean. Mark points out that they didn’t test his blood alcohol. Doug notes that the two of them have stayed out late drinking plenty of times; does Mark check his blood alcohol every morning? Mark wants to tell Doug something as a friend, but since Mark has already acted like a boss, Doug doesn’t want that. His personal life is no one’s business but his own. Mark yells that Doug already brought his personal life to work, and if he doesn’t see a problem with that, he shouldn’t be there.

Anspaugh arrives at the tail end of the fight, asking for a status report on Mark and Weaver’s study. Weaver quickly whisks him away. When a surgical patient comes in, Mark says he’ll take him, even though that screws with the new system. He tells Doug they’re done with their conversation. Carol has to walk Doyle through Jung Koo’s exam, since she hasn’t done one in a long time. Jung Koo is clearly uncomfortable, but Carol makes it a lot less scary for her (and probably for Doyle, too).

Benton chats with Laura-Lee’s mother, who’s frustrated with her daughter’s emotional response to her medical problems. Benton, of course, has no idea how to help her. Keaton tells Mrs. Armitage to stop babying her daughter and set limits. She’s hopeful that this will be Laura-Lee’s last surgery anyway. Carter has gotten a postcard from Susan, but Mark hasn’t heard from her since she left for her Hawaiian vacation. Doyle’s grateful for Carol’s guidance with Jung Koo, which was the result of the many years Carol has put into her job.

As Carol’s mother, Helen, arrives to have dinner with her, they run into a woman who’s looking for Doug. She’s Nadine’s sister, Claire, and she’s not surprised that Nadine died after partying. Doug says a friend brought her to the hospital, but Claire doesn’t think someone she was with at 4 a.m. was much of a friend. Claire reveals that Nadine had epilepsy and knew she shouldn’t drink.

Doug takes her to see Nadine’s body, which turns Claire from bitter to sad. She says that Nadine lost her confidence when she started having seizures, and the guys she hooked up with always made her feel even worse about herself. She hopes Nadine found whatever she was looking for. The waiting room is now the site of a dance party as Mickey teaches the nurses and patients some moves. He gets Jeanie to loosen up a little and join in, which makes both her and Weaver happy.

Over at Doc Magoo’s, Helen lectures Carol on not being so free with her money, since she lives on a nurse’s salary. Carol complains about knowing more than interns but still not making more money. Helen gives her some money, but Carol would rather take out a loan and owe a stranger than family. Helen suggests that she see it as rent instead. Keaton compliments Benton on his work in surgery, then says he needs to work on his bedside manner with children and their families. He acted like his job was over once the operation was done. His hands are great; he needs to work on showing some heart.

Carter tries to get a photo place to remake his slides, but he’s not having any luck. Carol asks him how bad it is living back at home. Her mother wants to spend a night a week at Carol’s house when she comes to town to see friends. Carter points out that she can just sign up for shifts those nights. Carol agrees, then takes the info Doyle was discussing about med school.

Mickey takes McKenna to his car, then goes back into the hospital to ask Jeanie out. She says she can’t date patients, and he points out that he wasn’t her patient. He keeps pressing, but Jeanie won’t give in, so he gives up. Benton goes to Carla’s restaurant, which is bigger and more successful than the place she ran when they dated. She figures he came all the way out there because he has a “taste for something,” and it’s probably not food.

Carol runs into Doug on an El platform, and he tells her about Claire. He let her think he was just a doctor instead of the person Nadine was with when she started seizing. “I think I really did it this time,” he admits. Carol thinks he’s there to mope, and that she’s expected to just tell him he’s a good guy, so he can go back out and screw up again. She won’t play along, telling him he’s on his own this time. Doug says he didn’t know that Nadine was sick. Carol notes that he didn’t know her at all.

Doug heads home, where the margaritas he and Nadine drank the previous night are still on the counter. His answering machine is full of messages from women who want to see him again. In his bathroom he finds Nadine’s medic-alert bracelet, identifying her as epileptic. He deletes all his messages, ignoring his numerous fans.

Thoughts: Laura-Lee is played by Mena Suvari. McKenna is played by an unrecognizable Jim O’Heir.

Helen Hathaway: the only woman in Chicago immune to Doug’s charms.

Mickey wasn’t that hot. The nurses must have low standards.

January 5, 2019

The X-Files 9.6, Trust No 1: Instead of the Shadow Man, They Should Call Him Sir Veillance

Posted in TV tagged , , at 1:19 pm by Jenn

Even for the early ’00s, this is laughably outdated

Summary: Ugh, a voiceover. Scully talks about the miracle of William’s birth and how they may never know the truth behind it. If he ever finds his perfect match, he should take a risk and go on adventures with that person to find the truth. Truth doesn’t come from science, but from your own heart. Also, Mulder is Scully’s true love, and she all but admits it. There’s a montage of past Mulder/Scully moments, ending with her kneeling over a body, so I guess we’re supposed to think that Mulder comes back in this episode and dies, but there’s no way that’s going to happen.

A security camera watches Scully as she waits for someone on a train platform. Then at some other point at time, she takes William to the Federal Grounds Internet Café in D.C. She checks her email, receiving a message from trust_no1@mail.com, entitled “Dearest Dana.” (By the way, Scully’s email address is queequeg0925@hotmail.com.) The email writer says he’s lonely and wants to come home to her and William. But can it really be Mulder if he calls her Dana?

Another woman enters with a baby as Scully sends an email back warning that Mulder isn’t safe. She stops writing when she hears the other woman’s baby crying and realizes the woman isn’t in the café anymore. She’s stepped outside to fight with someone. Scully stays with the baby until the woman comes back to get her.

Scully rereads her email before Doggett and Reyes come to see her at her new job. They tell her that someone keeps contacting the FBI insisting on talking to Mulder. He won’t say who he is, and he keeps covering his tracks. Today he admitted that he has information on the super-soldiers and wants to give Mulder their names. This person will only talk to him. Scully says she can’t contact Mulder, and she’s not sure it would be a good idea to do so anyway.

She tries to move on to teaching her class, but Doggett pulls her away to tell her how important the list of super-soldiers’ names could be. If they can track them all down and neutralize them, it could be safe for Mulder to come home. Scully’s worried they’ll just put him in more danger. Doggett asks how long she’s going to refuse to trust him or anyone else. If she keeps this up, Mulder will never be able to come home.

When Scully gets home that night, the woman from Federal Grounds is on her street, again fighting with the man from before. He takes the baby from her as she begs him not to leave. Scully offers to call the police, but though the woman is upset, she’s not upset enough that this looks like a kidnapping. Scully lets the woman, Patti, come to her apartment to use her phone and talk. Patti can tell that Scully’s parenting alone and says that maybe her partner will come back.

In Bethesda, Doggett and Reyes meet up to discuss the source who’s been trying to contact Mulder. He called Doggett’s cell phone, and though Doggett couldn’t trace the call, he was able to find the general area where it was placed. He thinks he’s found the exact building the source called from. Reyes is now on Scully’s side, worrying that they’ll endanger Mulder even more. But when a guy Doggett thinks is the source arrives at the building, he ignores her warnings and goes out to search the guy’s car. Oh, and the guy? The same man Patti was fighting with.

The man is at the building to work and avoid small talk with one of his co-workers. That co-worker (who only ever gets identified as the Shadow Man, so we’ll go with that) is watching surveillance footage of Doggett and Reyes as they search the other man’s car. He may also be the person watching Scully as she waits on the train platform, joined by a man whose face we can’t see.

Early the next morning, after a night on stakeout, Doggett sees the man from the street leaving work and follows him. Patti, who has spent a sleepless night on Scully’s couch, turns off the baby monitor and starts to take William out of his bassinet. Scully wakes up when Doggett calls to tell her the guy they’re tailing has arrived at her building. Scully hears William and senses that something’s wrong. She approaches the room with her gun out and orders Patti to put him down.

As Patti obeys, looking like she didn’t mean any harm, Doggett catches the man from the street trying to pick Scully’s lock. He takes the guy down and confirms that Scully doesn’t know him. (I’m tired of calling him “the man from the street.” The actor’s name is Steven, so I’m calling him that now.) Scully thinks that Patti and Steven staged their argument to con her for some reason. She suspects they’re after William. Patti says she wants to help him, but Steven tells her not to say anything further.

Upset, Patti says that Steven told her Scully could help them. All Steven will tell the agents is, “They’re watching.” He works for the NSA, and if the agents call the police on him, he’ll be detained until another NSA agent can come get him. He and his fellow agents don’t exist as citizens. He only came over to get Patti, who wants help for their daughter, Joy. She thinks both William and Joy are “different.”

Doggett asks how they could know anything about William. Steven says he knows almost everything about Scully, Doggett, and Reyes. He knows that Scully saw the mobile spinning over William’s bassinet, as if he was moving it with his mind. The same thing happened with Joy. Reyes asks how they’re surveilling everyone, wondering if Steven is the person trying to contact Mulder. He says he just looks at what he’s told to look at. But his supervisor has looked into the super-soldier program and crimes committed against innocent people. The supervisor says Mulder’s the only one who can connect all the dots.

The Shadow Man, using a voice modulator, calls to tell Scully that he’s been listening to the whole conversation. He was also watching through the window before she closed her blinds. He warns that something else is coming, and he’d like to talk to Mulder. He knows Scully’s in contact with him, since they’re exchanging emails. Scully refuses to continue talking to the Shadow Man unless they meet in person. He agrees to meet her at the Internet café but tells her not to keep trying to find him.

Scully gets ready to leave, asking Reyes to babysit. Doggett doesn’t like the idea of Scully going to meet the Shadow Man alone, but she reminds him that he told her she has to trust someone. She waits on the bus bench outside the café, confirming for the Shadow Man when he calls that she has a gun just in case. He tells her to follow his instructions exactly and not talk to anyone else about it. If she doesn’t do what he says, she should be prepared to use her gun in self-defense.

The Shadow Man sends Scully to a car and tells her to drive. He’s not too concerned with traffic safety. He sends her to an alley to switch cars and tells her to head west on the interstate. It’s dark when Scully finally reaches her unknown destination and is told to open her trunk and change clothes. Scully says she’s in the middle of nowhere, but the Shadow Man says that doesn’t exist anymore. As she’s finishing changing clothes, he appears in person and blows up the car.

The Shadow Man checks out Scully’s watch; when she complains that this has gone on too long, he reminds her that this is all about seeing Mulder again. She wonders how he knew her clothing size. The Shadow Man tells her he knows everything about her from childhood to adulthood – her ATM PIN, her college boyfriend’s name, her real hair color (which…is red, since she had red hair as a kid, but whatever), etc. He even knows that she and Mulder slept together. “I was as surprised as you are,” he says.

Scully wants to know what gives the Shadow Man the right or authority to spy on her. He tells her he’s the future, and he’s risking his life meeting with her. But he needs to tell Mulder what he knows, or there won’t be a future. He sends Scully to another car and tells her to get in touch with Mulder in the next 24 hours, or Scully will never hear from the Shadow Man again.

Doggett bugs Scully at work again the next day, telling her he’s worried about what he’s gotten her involved in. He’s been thinking about why the Shadow Man needs Scully to contact Mulder for him. Obviously, he’s using Scully because he knows Mulder will do whatever she wants. Scully reminds Doggett that the Shadow Man contacted him first. He only contacted Scully after Patti started talking. Doggett suggests that Patti and Steven are working with the Shadow Man.

Scully believes that Patti is as scared for Joy as Scully is for William. Patti and Steven don’t even necessarily trust the Shadow Man. Doggett doesn’t know why the Shadow Man thinks Scully can ensure a safe way home for Mulder. She admits that she and Mulder prearranged that stuff when he left, and she’s put the wheels in motion. He’ll be arriving via train at midnight. Doggett tells Scully she can’t be the one to meet Mulder when he arrives, no matter how badly she wants to see him. Scully says it’s too late, and she’s sticking to her and Mulder’s plan. At 10:48 that night, she goes to the train station, under the Shadow Man’s surveillance.

Meanwhile, Doggett goes to an FBI lab to meet up with an agent named Edie Boal. He wants her to get forensic information from Scully’s clothes, which the Shadow Man handled. As Reyes keeps an eye on Scully at the station, Steven spraypaints a camera to cut off one of the Shadow Man’s surveillance tools.

20 minutes to midnight, Doggett gets impatient in his office. The train platform starts filling up as a train approaches. As things go slow-motion, Steven pulls out a gun and points it at Scully. Reyes sees and warns her, but Steven isn’t aiming at Scully after all. He yells for her to run as the Shadow Man nears with his own gun drawn. Reyes pushes Scully down to the ground as the Shadow Man shoots Steven, then turns on the women.

Before they can reach for their own weapons, Doggett appears and shoots the Shadow Man. He falls off the platform and gets run over by the train. Scully and Reyes yell for the station manager to get the train to stop, but he orders the conductor to keep moving. Wave goodbye to Mulder as he rides by. And also wave goodbye to Steven, because he’s dead.

When the sheriff’s department arrives to investigate, the Shadow Man’s body is gone. Patti tells Scully that she and Steven had nothing to do with the Shadow Man’s game. Scully already knows. Doggett confirms for Scully and Reyes that the Shadow Man is missing, and the DNA found on the clothes can’t be tested. Doggett thinks he’s a super-soldier.

Scully immediately says that they need to warn Mulder. She tells the station manager that they need to get a message to the conductor. She thinks the Shadow Man got on the train and is going after Mulder. Just then, a message comes over the manager’s walkie-talkie reporting a jumper on the train, about to jump into a quarry.

The agents speed to the quarry, splitting up for some reason so Doggett and Reyes are on foot and Scully’s in a car. Doggett yells to a man in the quarry, thinking he’s Mulder, but the man keeps running. Scully comes across the Shadow Man and tries to run from him, but she’s in a quarry, so she can’t really get away. She pulls her gun, as if a bullet will stop a super-soldier. He tells her that either Mulder or William has to die. Scully demands to know what’s wrong with William. Before he can respond, the Shadow Man starts convulsing. His skin turns gray and he flies into a wall of the quarry, as if he’s being pulled in by a giant magnet.

We’re left with just an episode-ending voiceover as Scully emails Mulder. She thinks he jumped off the train because he knows about the super-soldiers. She hopes whatever iron compound is in the quarry is the key to destroying all the super-soldiers. She’s determined to see Mulder again and regain the comfort and safety they only enjoyed for a short time. She signs the email “Dana,” which is just…weird.

Thoughts: The Shadow Man is played by Terry O’Quinn, in his third role on the show. Patti is played by Allison Smith. Boal is played by Kathryn Joosten.

Ten begrudging cool points to whoever named a D.C. coffee shop Federal Grounds.

Trivia: Scully was afraid of clowns as a kid.

Are we not allowed to see Scully or Reyes shoot people? Why does Doggett always end up saving them?

January 1, 2019

ER 3.3, Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: Benton’s Never-Ending Power Trip Continues

Posted in TV tagged , , , , at 1:06 pm by Jenn

The way this story goes is…so weird

Summary: Susan is in a great mood when she runs into Mark on the way to work. Tomorrow she’s going on her long-awaited Hawaiian vacation. Mark tells her that Anspaugh is planning some big changes for the hospital, and Mark is anticipating a lot of problems. He thinks the interns coming over from Southside will be incompetent. Carter’s neighbor Betty brings him borscht for breakfast and asks him to look at some buildup in her ears. He sends her to another doctor who lives in the building.

At County, Weaver introduces Mark and Susan to Maggie Doyle, an intern from Southside. They head to a staff meeting with Anspaugh, who warns that their patient load is about to increase. They’ll have to meet quotas, and those who see the most patients in a day will get a gumdrop. Those who see the least have to wax Anspaugh’s car. Mark asks if they get points for dead patients. Anspaugh says yes, but they should try not to kill anyone. He learns that Weaver has a lot of responsibilities and tells Mark to take over reviewing charts.

Lydia tends to a man named Dante who claims a kangaroo attacked him in a local park. She figures he’s just drunk. Mark’s workload has been slowed down by all the chart review, and Doug urges him to speed up or risk having to wax Anspaugh’s car. Doyle proves to be self-motivating and competent (apparently the interns at Southside were better than County’s), but Mark asks her to stay close to Doug so she can be supervised on her first day.

Carol comes in complaining that someone parked a BMW in her spot. It was Doyle, who says she’ll move, not realizing that Carol’s car was repossessed, so she doesn’t need the spot. Really, Carol’s just mad that Doyle, an intern, drives a BMW. Benton tries to stop Jeanie from giving a patient stitches, pulling her out of the room to ask if she told the patient’s mother that she’s HIV-positive. Jeanie tells him it’s none of his business.

By the time Mark is ready to see patients, everything’s under control. He complains that he hasn’t had a day off since Christmas, so Susan invites him along on her trip to Hawaii. He gets called away before either of them can take this ridiculous idea any further.

Carol examines a man named Mr. Sidowski who seems to have a kidney stone. She explains that his enjoyment of ice cream and iced tea cause the recurring problems. Mr. Sidowski recognizes the chemical compound involved, and Carol suddenly recognizes him – he was her chemistry teacher in high school. He remembers her as a good student and thinks she’s become a doctor. She reluctantly tells him she’s a nurse.

Mark tends to an 89-year-old man named Mr. Johnson who was brought in from his care facility. No one’s sure of his quality of life or if he has a DNR, and Lydia can’t get any info from the facility. Mark makes the decision to work on him as if he was any other patient. Carter and Gant complain about their lack of OR time, and how badly Benton treats them. Carter recognizes the name of a Southside pediatric surgeon from Southside, Abby Keaton, and guesses that Benton’s going to try to get in good with her. Gant can’t imagine Benton wanting to work with kids, but Carter thinks he’ll want the challenge.

A motorcyclist comes in with a chest impalement, thanks to a collision with a glass truck. Weaver tells Jeanie to hold the giant shard of glass, but Jeanie knows that’s too risky and runs off to get Malik to take her place. Mark goes through the motions with Johnson until he learns that he doesn’t have a DNR. But he’s been unresponsive for more than 12 minutes, so Mark declares him dead. As soon as Mark stops trying to resuscitate him, Johnson’s heart starts beating again.

Mark talks to Doug about possible going to Hawaii with Susan. He’s not sure if she invited him as a friend or if she has something else in mind. Jerry hears a news report about a kangaroo seen by the highway, which means Dante wasn’t having a drunk hallucination. Susan tells Carol that she invited Mark on her trip and quickly realized what a bad idea that was.

Carter brings Benton a surgical case and casually asks if he can scrub in. Benton distractedly says yes, thinking more about a conversation he’s about to have with Anspaugh. (Trivia: Anspaugh was Norman Schwarzkopf’s roommate at West Point.) He wants to drop his thoracic fellowship and try to get a slot with Keaton. Anspaugh gives him until 6 p.m. to seal the deal.

Doug and Doyle meet with a teenager named Jane who has what presents as a bladder infection. Doyle, however, thinks she’s pregnant and chose to come to County because no one she knows would see her there. Doug agrees with this assessment. Carter can’t get an OR for his patient, so he lies to the scheduling nurse about the patient’s condition to get to the front of the line. Just when you thought Carter had learned not to do dumb things…

Jeanie tells Weaver she’s sorry she ran out of the trauma room; she wasn’t feeling well but is okay now. Benton tries to invite himself into an OR where Keaton is about to perform surgery, but someone warns him to leave her alone. Johnson’s son arrives at the hospital, and Mark asks if Johnson has ever discussed a DNR. The son doesn’t know what his father would want, so he asks for Mark’s opinion. Mark suggests just making Johnson comfortable and letting nature take its course. The son doesn’t get it and asks Mark to help his father.

Anspaugh learns of Carter’s lie and comes to the OR to observe. The scheduling nurse busts Carter for lying that they’re removing a horrible tumor. Gant, meanwhile, is having a great day. Jane isn’t pregnant, but she does have gonorrhea, so…she’s not having such a great day. Doug recommends that she tell any guys she’s slept with, but Jane says the only boy she’s had sex with won’t talk to her anymore. Her first time wasn’t so special. Doug tells her that guys who want to sleep with her might not actually like her that much. If she wants sex to be special, she should wait for the right guy…and maybe be really patient.

Thanks to Johnson’s son’s failure to just let his father go, Mark is forced to try to revive him when his heart stops again. Benton still hasn’t been able to talk to Keaton, whose schedule is pretty full. He leaves her a note, but he’s the only one who gets how important this is. Benton finds Gant giving Carter a shot of compazine for his anxiety-related nausea, and instead of yelling at Carter for his lie, he gets mad at Gant for assisting another doctor with an operation without Benton’s permission. It looks like Benton won’t need to confront Carter – Anspaugh will take care of that for him.

Mark complains to Doug about having to take orders from Johnson’s son, who has no medical background. Anspaugh chastises Doug for not wearing his stethoscope, then brags about how great Doyle is, thanks to what he’s taught her. Susan and Mark run into each other for the first time since the Hawaii invitation was extended, and he asks how much a hotel room would cost. Susan says she’ll check. It’s super-awkward.

The kangaroo has been cornered in a building, and Jerry worries that the police or an Animal Control officer will shoot it. Carol hopes they do, since it looks like a giant rat. Jeanie asks Benton if he plans to tell anyone about her HIV status. He says he doesn’t agree with how she’s handling things, but it’s her business, so he’s not getting involved. However, he also doesn’t want to be in a trauma room with her.

Doyle compliments Doug on how good he was talking to Jane. He brushes her off to go flirt with another doctor. Carol can’t find a doctor for something, so she reluctantly asks Doyle to help her. Doyle tells her to wait a minute. At the interns’ rounds (where doctors get to go over patients and torture the interns with questions), Anspaugh puts a spotlight on Carter, who has a weird reaction to the compazine shot and can no longer turn his neck. Anspaugh doesn’t notice and just keeps asking him questions.

Doyle coolly gives Mr. Sadowski some medication, then tells Carol she hates him – he was also her chemistry teacher in high school, and he flunked her. Carol thinks she remembers Doyle from school, but it turns out she’s thinking of Doyle’s older sister. Doyle is actually three years younger than Carol. I guess this is a big deal? An Animal Control officer comes in, having been shot with a tranquilizer dart. The kangaroo remains at large.

Johnson’s care facility finds his living will, which says he had a DNR and shouldn’t be on a ventilator. All the work Mark did to save him was a waste. Also, Johnson signed the will as a witness and should have known all this. He gives Mark a ham from his job and asks Mark to call him when Johnson wakes up. Mark manages to refrain from shoving the ham down the guy’s throat.

Jane wants to say goodbye to Doug, so Doyle pulls him out of an exam room where he was hooking up with his new crush. Despite Benton’s wishes, he and Jeanie end up working on a trauma together. He can’t exactly kick her out, at least not without making Weaver suspicious, so they act professionally and save the patient. Jerry calls the Australian embassy to find out what kangaroos like to eat. If you think this show’s subplots couldn’t get any dumber than this…well, we’re only on season 3. Just wait.

Mark calls someone to get permission to take Johnson off his ventilator. Connie interrupts to tell him that Johnson is awake. Even after all the times Mark had to resuscitate him, his mental state appears to be fine. Gant asks Carter how long they’re going to put up with Benton treating them badly and not letting them assist in surgeries. He dreads having to put up with this for a year. Betty comes in with smoke inhalation and the news that there was a fire in the building. Carter appears to be homeless.

Benton races to talk to Keaton by his 6 p.m. deadline, but she’s left for the day. Johnson tells Mark what was pretty obvious from the start – that his son probably doesn’t have the mental capacity to be in charge of things like other people’s medical care. Johnson says he’s had a good life and is ready for it to end.

Benton goes to tell Anspaugh that he’s sticking with thoracic surgery after all, but Anspaugh’s gone for the day. He doesn’t realize that the woman sitting at Anspaugh’s desk is Keaton. She got his note and is willing to talk about his desire to switch to pediatric surgery. Weaver makes small talk with Jeanie about Al and how hard it must be for him to be sick on his own. She has a friend who tested positive and doesn’t want to tell anyone. Weaver knows it must be hard to carry that weight around. Jeanie says it is, finally realizing that Weaver knows she’s HIV-positive. Weaver’s glad Jeanie’s going to keep working.

Mark has decided to go to Hawaii, believing that Susan wants the trip to be romantic. Doug tells him that Doyle is a competent intern, so she should stick around. Haleh tells Mark that Johnson died on his way to the ICU. Carol tries being nice to Doyle, and is probably a little gleeful when Doyle admits she’s still living at home with her parents. The BMW was a gift from her father, a cop, who bought it at a police auction. He wanted Doyle to become a cop, too, but she decided to go to nursing school and follow in her mother’s footsteps. She dropped out because she was bad at taking orders.

It looks like Jerry also lives with his mother, since she’s in the house while he uses a flashlight to keep an eye out for the kangaroo. Anspaugh is disappointed that Mark only saw one patient during his shift (and the patient died anyway, so Mark didn’t accomplish a whole lot). Weaver and Susan tied for seeing the most patients, but Susan sneaks one more in before the end of her shift. As promised, she gets gumdrops (a whole bag instead of just one – Anspaugh is so generous!) and Mark gets turtle wax.

Before Mark can accept the Hawaii invitation, Susan rescinds it, saying she wasn’t really serious about it. Mark pretends he wasn’t, either. They’re both disappointed to have to spend the next ten days apart. While walking home from work, Carol hears a crash in an alley and spots the kangaroo having a snack from a trash can. She looks around as if she’s looking for someone else who sees it, then just shakes her head and walks away. I guess after all the crazy stuff she’s seen at work, a kangaroo on the loose is no big deal.

Thoughts: Doyle is played by Jorja Fox. Keaton is played by the late Glenne Headly. Jane is played by Sara Rue.

For all the talk about how tough Anspaugh is, he never does anything that bad.

Johnson’s son’s name appears to be John. So that’s unfortunate.

December 29, 2018

The X-Files 9.5, Lord of the Flies: The Bug Whisperer

Posted in TV tagged , , at 1:04 pm by Jenn

Being attacked by bugs could definitely traumatize someone enough to lead him to cooking meth

Summary: Two obnoxious teen boys calling themselves Sky Commander Winky and Captain Dare welcome us to their Jackass-type show, creatively called Dumbass. Looks like the title is fitting. Captain Dare puts on a football helmet and lets Winky fire balls at him. Later, Captain Dare asks a girl named Natalie for a kiss before he lets himself be dragged behind a car in a Porta-Potty. Natalie doesn’t bother to hide how stupid she thinks this all is. The rest of the crowd gathered thinks the guys are awesome.

Captain Dare’s next stunt is riding a shopping cart down a hill, supposedly flying over Natalie as she holds up a torch. She objects to participating, but Winky’s excited to see the cart get set on fire, then extinguish itself in a kiddie pool. Somehow, Natalie agrees to the stunt, lying down on the road and holding the little torch in her mouth. But Captain Dare and Winky’s expert calculations fail, and Captain Dare tips the cart over before he even get to her. Even with the helmet on, Captain Dare (real name: Bill) gets his head caved in. And that, kids, is why you don’t try this at home.

Doggett and Reyes go to Ocean County, New Jersey (not to be confused with Atlantic City, I assume), to check out Bill’s body. The medical examiner, Dr. Fountain, thinks they’re medical experts, which he really needs since he has no idea what happened to Bill’s body. But he’s feeling pressured to get some answers, since Bill’s parents are suing everyone possible, including the company that made his helmet (fair), the county for making the road too steep (probably not fair), and the grocery store he stole the shopping cart from (definitely not fair).

Fountain tells the agents about the Dumbass show, which makes Doggett figure that this was, you know, an accident. Fountain says since the agents are the experts in unexplained events, they should explain this to him. Reyes sees something fluttering under one of Bill’s closed eyelids and cuts it open. A ton of flies buzz out.

Scully is next to come to Ocean County, and she’s as stumped as Fountain is. She thinks the flies caused Bill’s head to cave in, since the crash didn’t – there’s no sign of trauma from the tip-over. Doggett wonders if someone put something in Bill’s helmet, like Spanish fly. Scully’s more interested in finding out more about the flies themselves, then looking into possible murder motives.

A man saunters into the office, telling the agents that they’re dealing with an Australian bush fly. They’ll often crawl into people’s skulls looking for protein, eventually killing them. This is Rocky Bronzino, an entomologist from Rutgers. He’s full of charm, but Scully isn’t impressed. He says the flies from Bill’s body are harmless. Reyes tells him they’re the agents’ primary murder suspects.

Poor Natalie is struggling to make it through the day at school, sitting alone at lunch and missing her boyfriend. Winky ambushes her to make a memorial video for Bill. Natalie yells that Winky and his brother (who also worked on the show) are jerks for making Bill participate in their stunts.

Another guy in the cafeteria, Dylan, starts to approach and rescue Natalie, but Winky turns on him. Before he can do whatever a stereotypical bully would do to a quiet, geeky kid like Dylan, a teacher (principal? Guidance counselor? I don’t know) named Mrs. Lokensgard summons Winky (real name: David) to her office. This just makes thinks worse for Dylan, since Mrs. Lokensgard is his mom, and now it looks like he needs her to stick up for him.

Doggett and Reyes watch footage of Bill’s last stunts, and it looks like Doggett’s more amused than he should be. He guesses that the flies saw Bill as a good meal because he had “crap for brains.” Reyes thinks Doggett must have engaged in some stupidity in his youth as well. (Wrong, Reyes. Doggett was born 22 and serious.) Doggett says this is different – these kids take pride in being stupid. Reyes points out the accuracy of the show’s title.

The agents are in Mrs. Lokensgard’s office to talk to David, who recently tried to sell the video of Bill’s death to some TV networks. He says Fox was the only network that showed any interest. (This is supposed to be a joke, since that was The X-Files‘ network, but really, it sounds plausible.) The agents suspect that David killed Bill to make money. In fact, they think he put something in Bill’s helmet. David starts fidgeting and thinks he’s about to suffer the same insect-related fate as his best friend. The agents see “DUMBASS” spelled out in insect bites on his back.

Dylan gets home late that night and tries to skip dinner, but his mother insists that they talk. He ignores her and goes to his room to listen to music and look at a picture of Natalie. Bugs cover his windows and walls as he cries himself to sleep.

Back at the medical examiner’s office, Scully tells Doggett and Reyes something Rocky discovered: All the flies from Bill’s bodies were female. She thinks this means something about Bill made the flies attack. Doggett wonders if they were trying to “express themselves,” like the lice that attacked David and bit “DUMBASS” into his skin. Reyes no longer thinks David was responsible for Bill’s death, but she does believe that someone is controlling bugs.

The agents have looked at pictures from the crowds gathered at various Dumbass stunts and spotted Dylan in all of them. He’s also had run-ins with Bill and David. Obviously, the agents need to question him. At the Lokensgards’ house, Natalie comes by to talk to Dylan, but his mother sends her away. Dylan goes out his window to avoid his mother and catch up to his crush. It doesn’t work, since Mrs. Lokensgard intercepts him and tells him to stay away from Natalie. She wants to talk about the changes his body is going through, but Dylan doesn’t want to have that talk with his mother.

Scully and Rocky go to the street where Bill died, and he waxes poetic about flowers and pheromones. Strangely, the bio sensor they’re using doesn’t detect any pheromones in the area. Scully doesn’t get why pheromones would make a harmless fly become violent anyway. Rocky says bugs are unpredictable and react to stimuli. He moves closer to Scully as he says that something must be driving the bugs “crazy with desire.” The same thing appears to be happening to him. He doesn’t even back off when Scully tells him she has a child.

The bio sensor picks up something approaching, but Rocky and Scully look in the air for bugs, not on the ground for people, so they miss Dylan riding by on his bike. At school, he crashes it when he finds Natalie, who feels bad about how David treated him the day before. She wishes they could go back in time, make everything go away, and start over. She and Dylan were friends as kids, and she has fond memories of playing together. He once carved their names in a tree they hid in during a game of Manhunt.

Doggett and Reyes show up to question Dylan, showing him footage from Dumbass. He tries to stay calm. The same can’t be said for his mother, who gets understandably upset when she learns that her son is being questioned in her office without her knowledge. As files appear on the ceiling, only noticed by Dylan, Mrs. Lokensgard defends her son. It’s hard to continue that, though, when she and the agents realize that he’s covered in flies.

By the time a team arrives to get rid of the bugs, they’re gone. Dylan’s unharmed, and his mother isn’t about to let the agents keep questioning him. David and his brother glare at Dylan as his mother whisks him away. Reyes thinks this was a show – Dylan made the bugs attack him so he’ll look like a victim instead of a perpetrator. Doggett asks if he’s “the horse whisperer, only for bugs.” Reyes doesn’t know, but she has an idea to follow up on.

The agents take Scully a tissue that Dylan used to wipe off some sweat during his questioning. They hope there will be something Scully can find in his sweat. Indeed, Rocky finds a huge amount of insect pheromones in Dylan’s sweat. Scully thinks his hormones are attracting bugs, but Reyes thinks there’s something else going on – he’s able to control the bugs. They saw him talking to Natalie, whom Doggett recognizes as Bill’s girlfriend. Maybe she’s the key.

Natalie comes by Dylan’s house again that night, climbing up to his window even after he tells her not to. He remembers the exact time she was last there, in the fourth grade. They talk about Dylan’s love of Syd Barrett from Pink Floyd; Dylan feels a kinship with him because they’re both misunderstood. Natalie wishes that she’d expressed her condolences back when Dylan’s father disappeared years ago. She hasn’t forgotten her friendship with Dylan, and she’s just now remembering how special he is to her.

They kiss, and he dubs it “amazing.” But something’s up with Dylan’s tongue, and Natalie ends up with blood in her mouth. She runs off crying. Seconds later, David and some of his friends arrive, calling Dylan “fly boy.” They take Dylan for a ride in their car and ask how he killed Bill. He offers to give a demonstration, telling David to film it. Dylan opens his mouth and some insect thing emerges. The car’s driver freaks out and crashes.

Scully and Rocky go to the Lokensgards’ house, where they detect insect pheromones. Scully considers that enough probable cause to allow them to enter without permission. Rocky’s excited because he’s never worked with a partner before. Scully: “I have.” He thinks this is a special kind of partnership where both of them get to use their knowledge to reach higher than they could on their own. “You complete me,” he says. Scully tries to keep things professional.

Doggett and Reyes come across the crashed car, which is now full of what looks like a bunch of spider’s webs. David tells them that Dylan attacked them and chewed himself out the back window, because he’s a bug. Reyes heads off to look for him at Natalie’s house. Doggett calls Scully to tell her about the crash, thinking she should come see it for herself. She leaves Rocky behind at the Lokensgards’ house.

Reyes tells Natalie that she may be the key to stopping Dylan’s weird rampage. Natalie’s upset because she thought Dylan was normal, but he’s a freak. Reyes thinks he’s acting strangely because he’s going through changes. His bad kissing experience with Natalie might have led to his attack on David and his friends. Ugh, way to blame her for a guy’s behavior.

Before Reyes can take Natalie off to look for Dylan, Dylan finds them. He’s confused because he thought she wanted someone different from Bill and David; why is she so upset? He claims he’s been trying to protect her, and invites her to come somewhere with him. Meanwhile, Rocky’s pheromone detector leads him to Mrs. Lokensgard, who has the same insect tongue thing and web-shooting abilities as her son.

Just as Mrs. Lokensgard is done dealing with Rocky, Dylan and Natalie arrive, planning to take his mother’s car and run off together. Dylan doesn’t realize that his mom knows exactly who – or what – he is. She was never able to tell his father that she and Dylan aren’t like other people.

Doggett finds Reyes webbed up at Natalie’s house and frees her. They head to the Lokensgards’, where Scully has already arrived, having lost phone contact with Rocky. Instead, she finds Natalie there, unharmed but upset. She points Scully toward the attic, which is full of victims trapped by webs. “Help me,” one of the victims squeaks, a la The Fly. It’s Rocky, who has a big smile on his face when Scully gives him CPR (which he shouldn’t need, since he was breathing enough to talk, but okay).

Scully gives the end-of-episode report wrap-up: One of the bodies in the attic belonged to Dylan’s long-missing father. Mrs. Lokensgard was something between human and instinct, according to Rocky. She just couldn’t hide her biology any longer. She and Dylan are on the run now, to try to hide in another town, and Scully laments that Dylan couldn’t fight his biology long enough to be accepted. However, she thinks love could overcome biology, since the heart wants what it wants. Dylan has one last message for Natalie: a swarm of fireflies outside her bedroom window, spelling out “I love you.”

Thoughts: David is played by Aaron Paul. Mrs. Lokensgard is played by Jane Lynch.

Whoever came up with the name Rocky Bronzino gets a gold star.

I hope Scully charged him with sexual harassment after the case was over, though, because…ew.

December 25, 2018

ER 3.2, Let the Games Begin: Welcome, Overlord Anspaugh

Posted in TV tagged , , , , at 1:07 pm by Jenn

These dorks are kind of cute

Summary: Jeanie has finally gotten an appointment with an HIV/AIDS doctor to go over her treatment. Jeanie plans to pay for the medication in cash instead of letting her insurance handle it, since that would alert County to her diagnosis. The doctor goes over the instructions, which will give Jeanie a lot to keep track of. However, if she uses the proper medical precautions, she has only a tiny chance of transmitting HIV to a patient. Jeanie is clearly overwhelmed, and her doctor tells her to try to keep the disease from taking over her life.

Carter has moved to a new apartment building, and his neighbor, Betty, would like some medical advice. She’s having breathing problems, but she doesn’t seem to think that smoking a cigarette will do her any harm. Carter tells her to try an inhaler, then runs off to try to get to work without getting on Benton’s bad side. Carol, Haleh, and Lydia try to get control of a patient who’s high on PCP; she’s not their only wild patient today, and they wonder if the hot weather is making things worse. They then start worrying that the hospital will close, as is the current rumor.

Benton’s trying to track down Carter when he meets a surgeon named Wayne Lentloff who’d like to recruit him for cardiothoracics. Benton isn’t interested, but Lentloff is eager to change his mind. Susan and Mark get to work at the same time and talk about horrible dates they’ve gone on recently. Obviously these two should just get together, but that’s never going to happen.

On a train after her appointment, Jeanie opens a bill and gets annoyed. Carter’s late for surgery with Benton and Morgenstern, who are discussing Lentloff and Benton’s options for fellowships. Gant is there observing, and Benton tells Carter that Gant stepped in for him because he was late. E-Ray helps Jerry dress up his résumé in case County closes, though Carol points out that there are a few other hospitals that could close instead. Jerry suggests that she get her work history in order, too, but Carol knows she can’t make nursing sound like anything other than nursing.

Carter heads to the ER to do what Gant can’t do while he’s covering for Carter. Weaver tells Mark and Susan that Donald Anspaugh, the chief from Southside, has outlined some good ideas for rearranging the layout of the ER. For example, security should be closer, as it took them four minutes to help Carol, Lydia, and Haleh with their high patient. I have news for you, Weaver: Security will never get better, no matter how close they are to the patients.

Jeanie finds Al on a job site to confront him for having his medical treatments billed to her insurance. His new boss doesn’t give benefits, and Al is trying to work things out with COBRA. Jeanie’s unwilling to keep him on her insurance while he gets his own, since she has her own bills to worry about. As Carter and Carol receive an elderly patient, Doug tells Carol that her car is being towed away. She runs to the tow truck and learns that the car is being repossessed since she missed three payments.

Doug tries to get out of meeting his latest girlfriend’s parents, though he tells Jerry and Randi that she’s a friend from college. Randi tells Carol that she knows some guys who can track down the repo man, if she wants. I feel like Randi knows a lot of guys who can do a lot of things. A couple of teenagers Mark was supposed to talk to complain to Carol about how long they’ve had to wait. Carol takes them to the trauma room where Mark is doing something important and whines at him, only to be told to take the kids back to the waiting room. Come on, Carol.

Carter’s elderly patient has abdominal pains but is also disoriented and keeps yelling for someone named Thomas. The man’s home health-care nurse dumps him on the hospital and leaves for the weekend. Benton doesn’t think the patient needs surgery, so he advises Carter to dump the patient as well and go do something surgical.

Carol apologizes for being a brat earlier, then asks Mark if she can borrow his motorcycle. She has to be home at 3 for some reason, and she has no car, obviously, and won’t be able to catch the El. She takes Susan to meet the waiting teens, who had a mishap during sex and have misplaced their condom. Well, it’s not really misplaced. The girl definitely knows exactly where it is. She just won’t be able to extract it on her own.

Morgenstern tells Mark and Weaver that he has no idea which hospital is going to be closed. There’s going to be an announcement that afternoon. Anspaugh called Morgenstern to discuss the situation, panicking that he’s going to lose his job. Weaver likes Anspaugh, but Morgenstern has only horror stories to tell about him. He apparently hates everyone and won’t hesitate to act on personal grievances.

Doug admits that he knew Carol’s car was being repo’d, not towed. She calls him a coward for not telling her. He offers her a loan, but Carol has a plan in the works already – she’s going to sell her money pit of a house. Mark passes word to Susan that there’s a meeting at 5 to announce which hospital is being shut down. Susan just doesn’t want the news to affect her vacation, as she’s decided to go to Hawaii.

Betty shows up in the ER just as Manny, who runs the “roach coach” coffee cart outside, throws up on the admit desk. Thanks, show. Jeanie’s next patient, a boy named Alex, needs stitches, but she’s a little hesitant now that her blood can be dangerous for others. Speaking of dangerous, Carter gives Betty an oxygen tank, which is going to be fun since she keeps smoking. Carter’s elderly patient, Heath, flatlines, but Carter is able to revive him. Carol and Malik are pleased with his quick work. Benton arrives after Carter’s shown his stuff and is just annoyed that Carter hasn’t dumped Heath on someone else yet.

Carol rides Mark’s motorcycle home to meet a real estate agent, Mrs. Puro. Carol’s mother Helen is also there, and has told Mrs. Puro that Carol’s not selling. Carol says she is, but Mrs. Puro gives it to her straight: “I couldn’t sell this house if the rest of Chicago burned down around it.” It needs too much work, and even if Carol were able to fix it all up, no one’s going to want to live next to the El tracks. Mrs. Puro can’t believe Carol herself ever did.

Carter preps a hernia patient named Hartley for surgery while the patient chatters nervously. Carter advises Hartley to have local anesthesia instead of general so he can stay awake and talk to the surgeon during the procedure, since that will help him stay calm. I’m sure this recommendation is only for the patient’s benefit and not at all because the surgeon is Benton, and Carter knows that having to talk to the patient the whole time will drive him crazy.

Doug teases Susan about her bad recent date, then mentions that she has another date tonight, so Mark can laugh about it with him. Helen thinks that Carol wants to sell her house because it makes her think of Shep. Carol says she hadn’t even though of that. She’s enjoying living on her own; she just can’t afford it. Helen suggests that she call her uncle, who’s made a lot of money in real estate. At the very least, he’ll enjoy Carol’s company. Also, he’s sick and old and rich, and he has to leave his money to someone…

Carter’s revenge on Benton works perfectly, and in no time at all, Benton is fed up. Gant tries to distract Hartley with conversation, but Hartley takes more of Carter’s advice, asking about anatomy. Weaver and Mark head to the meeting where the closing announcement will be made. They were supposed to keep it quiet, but Mark told Susan, and Weaver told a bunch of people. Heath now thinks Carter is Thomas, and whispers something that makes Carter laugh.

The big meeting starts, and the woman running it cuts right to the chase: Southside is closing. Some staff members are coming to County, including Anspaugh, who will be the new chief of staff (since County’s current chief is retiring). News spreads through the hospital, and the staff celebrates at the admit desk. Mark notes that everyone’s happier than they’ve looked in a long time. Jeanie points out that they’re especially happy for people who get thrown up on for a living.

Carol has returned for the party, and asks Carter who he thinks Thomas was – Heath’s son? Carter thinks Thomas was Heath’s dog. The thing he whispered to Carter was, “Kibble, kibble, kibble, kibble.” Weaver calls Jerry from the lounge to let him know that Morgenstern isn’t coming to the celebration. He’s moping because he has to work for Anspaugh and thinks things are going to change for the worse. He tries to cheer himself up by asking Weaver on a date. She accepts! This is so weird! Maybe she doesn’t know it’s a date.

Susan runs away as Anspaugh approaches so Mark will have to talk to him alone. Mark flees, too, because he’s a chicken. Anspaugh puts on some jazz. Malik has a special patient for Carter and Carol – Heath’s nurse, who dumped him at the hospital. They scare him with all the possible health problems he might have and all the things they’ll need to do, starting with a barium enema.

Doug tries to butter up a co-worker named Heather, who’s annoyed that he’s canceled on her in the past. She gives in, because…I mean, have you seen him? Carol tells Jeanie that she was glad to help Carter have some fun, since Benton’s been so hard on him lately. Well, not just lately, but yeah, he’s been worse since Carter graduated.

Mark and his date run into Susan and her date out on the waterfront. The dates quickly hit it off with each other. Weaver, Jeanie, Carol, and Connie take a patient who should have gone to Southside if they hadn’t already closed to traumas. When the patient starts bleeding as Benton arrives, he tells Jeanie to leave. Weaver nicely (especially for her) sends Jeanie on an errand to cover up the fact that Benton decided on his own that he doesn’t need her help.

Susan and Mark’s dates may have ditched them, which Susan says will at least be a good story for them to eventually tell their grandchildren. The two of them take some pictures in a photo booth. Jeanie comes back to the trauma room (after the patient dies) and tells Benton to never treat her like that again. Benton doesn’t want her to put patients at risk, even though the odds of transmitting HIV through their work is so small. Jeanie asks if he would have quit his job if he’d tested positive. Benton says yes, and Jeanie points out that it’s a moot point, since he’s not the one who has to live with the disease. He leaves her there alone.

Thoughts: Betty is played by the late Eileen Brennan.

What would be worse, the anxiety involved in being rendered unconscious for surgery, or staying awake and having to experience (and remember) everything involved? I think I would want to be knocked out.

Mark, maybe you’re not having any luck with dating because you’re wearing scrub pants on your dates.

December 22, 2018

The X-Files 9.4, 4-D: Two Doggetts, No Waiting

Posted in TV tagged , , , , at 1:04 pm by Jenn

Imagine having this ability and using it to kill people instead of, like, jumping to the front of the line at Disney World

Summary: Reyes is in the mailroom of an apartment building, fixing a bike chain, while Doggett and Follmer watch a man named Lukesh on video surveillance. The three agents are working a sting to capture Lukesh, a suspected murderer who tears out his victims’ tongues. If he opens the mailbox for apartment 4-D, they’ll know they have the right guy. Once they’ve confirmed his identity, Reyes pulls her weapon and follows him into a stairwell. She loses sight of him, but he still has his eyes on her.

Doggett and Follmer hear Reyes scream as Lukesh attacks her. They run to the building and find Reyes bleeding in the stairwell, possibly dead and possibly minus one tongue. Doggett goes looking for Lukesh as Follmer warns that he took Reyes’ gun. Doggett corners Lukesh in an alley, but the man just smiles at him. When Doggett turns to tell his backup that he’s found their man, Lukesh disappears. He reappears behind Doggett and fires Reyes’ gun at him.

Reyes, completely unharmed, is unpacking in her huge new apartment. Doggett, also completely unharmed, comes over pretending that he wants to help, though he’s conveniently just missed the movers. He at least brings her some food, though she’s not as excited as he is about the best Polish sausage in D.C. Reyes gets a call from Skinner telling her that Doggett was found shot in an alley. Reyes is confused, since Doggett was just in her apartment five seconds ago. She’s even more confused to realize that he’s no longer there.

She goes to the hospital, where Follmer tells her he’s in charge of finding out what happened. He has no idea why Doggett was in the alley. Reyes insists that he was with her. Scully joins them with the news that Doggett will probably be paralyzed for life, assuming he survives the shooting. Reyes thinks they have the wrong man, but she’s the one who’s wrong – the patient she goes to see is definitely Doggett.

In the FBI’s ballistics lab, Follmer and Skinner learn that Doggett was shot with a gun like the kind issued to FBI agents. Follmer’s annoyed that Skinner has had the bullet for a couple of hours and is just now telling him anything about it. They need to improve their communication. He tells Skinner to run the bullet through the FBI’s databases. Skinner knows the bullet didn’t come from Doggett’s gun, which means Follmer must think it came from another agent’s weapon.

Reyes tells Scully that she’s sure Doggett was with her at the same time he was shot. Scully tells her that she had a similar experience when her father died. Maybe Doggett visited Reyes to say goodbye. Reyes thinks that Scully’s experience with her father was sweet, but this isn’t the same.

Skinner calls Scully and tells her to take Reyes to a police station. Follmer’s there waiting for them with some questions about Reyes’ claim that she was with Doggett when he was shot. Reyes clarifies that he was with her when Skinner called to say Doggett had been shot. Follmer plays good cop, asking for a reason Reyes would want to cover this up. Ballistics tests show that the bullet that shot Doggett came from Reyes. There’s also an eyewitness who saw her at the scene. It’s Lukesh.

For some reason, Reyes is allowed to go back to the hospital instead of being arrested. Skinner says he knows she didn’t shoot Doggett, but it doesn’t really matter what he believes. There are holes in the case. First of all, Reyes’ apartment is 14 miles from the scene of the shooting. Second of all, the bullet definitely came from her gun. Reyes asks for information on the eyewitness, but Skinner and Scully won’t tell her anything.

Doggett opens his eyes, though Scully says that could just be an involuntary muscle spasm. Doggett starts moving a finger, and Skinner realizes that he’s trying to communicate with Morse code. Before he loses consciousness again, he taps out “Lukesh.”

The man himself is back at his apartment building, going about his day like nothing’s happened. Also, he lives with his mom (who seems to have both physical and mental difficulties) and his first name is Erwin, so maybe we shouldn’t be surprised that he’s a serial killer. Oh, and he feeds his victims’ tongues to his mom, but she likes clamato juice, so it’s hard to decide which is grosser.

Skinner goes with Reyes to her apartment, where she throws out the remains of her Polish sausage (hey, no explanation for why that’s there other than Doggett had to have brought it? No? Okay). Skinner has decided to bend the rules and show her Lukesh’s file. He was diagnosed with a delusional disorder that started to emerge after his father committed suicide. Reyes thinks Doggett’s Morse code message was trying to tell them that Lukesh shot him. Maybe Doggett was in the alley by Lukesh’s apartment because he was investigating him.

Follmer calls Skinner to blast him some more for his poor communication skills. He wants Skinner to bring Reyes back to the hospital to talk to Doggett. He’s now conscious and can use a communication device often used with people who have spinal injuries. However, he won’t talk to anyone but Reyes.

Doggett taps out “alive,” which Reyes thinks refers to himself. He’s actually saying that she’s alive, which is a surprise to him. He taps out that her throat was cut – Lukesh killed her, then tried to kill Doggett. Across town, Lukesh sneaks out after his mom is asleep and vanishes into some sort of invisible portal with a straight razor.

Doggett has no sensation from the chest down, but he’s getting better with the tapping technology, so…that’s nice. Reyes tells him that the case isn’t going anywhere since there are so many unanswered questions. She asks him about the hot dog stand where he stopped for food before coming to her apartment. He tells her the Polish sausage there is the best in the city. Reyes wonders what it would take for them to both be in two places at once.

Doggett thinks it would be ridiculous for them both to have identical twins they don’t know about, but Reyes says it kind of makes sense. There could be a parallel universe full of doubles. Doggett says she’s been watching too much Star Trek. She reminds him that he said Lukesh disappeared when Doggett looked away for just a second. Then he reappeared and shot Doggett with Reyes gun, which she had on her the whole time. Maybe Lukesh can open a door to another dimension, and Doggett unknowingly followed him through that door. Then the Doggett at Reyes’ place was forced out of his dimension.

Follmer and Skinner bring Lukesh back to the police station to turn the tables – there’s an eyewitness who says he shot Doggett. They tell him that Doggett has regained consciousness and believes Lukesh is a serial killer. Follmer asks him to consent to a test that would shot gunshot residue on his hands if he’s recently fired a gun. Lukesh casually threatens to lawyer up, then says that Doggett is obviously confused.

Skinner asks about Lukesh’s mother; they live together, so can she corroborate his story? Lukesh says she was sleeping and is in poor health, so she’s not a good witness. When Skinner presses the issue, Lukesh gets angry, refusing to let the FBI harass his mother when he’s innocent. Skinner dismisses him with, “Say hi to Mama.”

Instead of leaving the station, Lukesh wanders into a bullpen, where Reyes sees him. “What’s the matter? Cat got your tongue?” he taunts. She tells him she’s figured out his secret and knows he lives in two worlds, one where he’s normal and one where he carries out sick fantasies. He kept his anger inside so long that he couldn’t restrain it anymore. Lukesh tells her that he enjoyed cutting her and watching her bleed.

He goes home and realizes that Reyes’ gun, which he’d stashed in a kitchen drawer, is gone. His mother found it, and she’s upset that her son has been keeping secrets. She knows he sneaks out of the house and must be doing something horrible. Lukesh says he doesn’t know how the gun got there. His mother says that the FBI keeps calling to speak to her; she has no idea why. He deletes their messages without listening to them. He has plans for his mother that don’t involve her talking to the FBI…or anyone else.

In a kinder use of a razor, Reyes shaves Doggett’s face at the hospital. He teases that she missed a spot. He thinks her theory is right, and that there are two Doggetts in this dimension. There shouldn’t be two, and he’d like Reyes to turn off his life support so the other Doggett will come back. Reyes thinks he’s using the theory as an excuse; there’s no way he would ever believe it. He asks if she does. If so, she can prove it. Reyes says she would do anything for him, but not that.

Skinner calls to report that Lukesh’s mother is dead, killed in the same way Doggett said Lukesh kills his victims. He doesn’t know if they’ll be able to find Lukesh, but Reyes guesses that he’ll find them. She goes home, jumpy about the possibility of Lukesh already being there waiting for her, but the other agents are keeping the building under video surveillance and will know if she’s in danger.

Unfortunately, Lukesh grabs her, pulls out her audio equipment, and keeps her out of the agents’ sight. When Reyes stops talking to the other agents through their comms, Scully guesses that Lukesh has gotten inside. He holds his straight razor to Reyes’ throat and tells her this time he’s going to bleed her slowly. Of course, the other agents come in and take him down before he can hurt her.

Reyes goes back to the hospital to test her theory. She cries as she turns off Doggett’s life support. Then she suddenly finds herself back in her apartment, with Doggett and the Polish sausage. He doesn’t understand why she’s crying, but she assures him that she’s okay.

Thoughts: Great casting on Lukesh. At first glance, he seems like a normal guy, but when you look closer, you can see something sinister in him.

Am I wrong or do Doggett and Reyes have…chemistry?

Is Morse code taught at the FBI academy or something? Or did Doggett and Skinner both learn it in the military?

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